Thomas Turner (microbiologist)

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Thomas B. Turner was an American microbiologist who was the dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine from 1957 to 1968. [1] [2]

Microbiologist person who investigates the characteristics of microscopic organisms

A microbiologist is a scientist who studies microscopic life forms and processes. This includes study of the growth, interactions and characteristics of microscopic organisms such as bacteria, algae, fungi, and some types of parasites and their vectors. Most microbiologists work in offices and/or research facilities, both in private biotechnology companies as well as in academia. Most microbiologists specialize in a given topic within microbiology such as bacteriology, parasitology, virology, or immunology.

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine academic medical teaching and research arm of Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM), located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States is the academic medical teaching and research arm of the Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876. The School of Medicine shares a campus with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, established in 1889. Johns Hopkins has consistently ranked among the top medical schools in the United States, in the number of research grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health. Its main teaching hospital, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, was ranked the number one hospital in the United States for 22 years by U.S. News & World Report.

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Anthony Hopkins Welsh actor

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Johns Hopkins University university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States

The Johns Hopkins University is a private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named for its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur, abolitionist, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. His $7 million bequest —of which half financed the establishment of Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States up to that time. Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution's first president on February 22, 1876, led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S. by integrating teaching and research. Adopting the concept of a graduate school from Germany's ancient Heidelberg University, Johns Hopkins University is considered the first research university in the United States. Over the course of several decades, the university has led all U.S. universities in annual research and development expenditures. In fiscal year 2016, Johns Hopkins spent nearly $2.5 billion on research.

Nat Turner American slave rebellion leader

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Johns Hopkins Hospital Hospital in Maryland, United States

The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) is the teaching hospital and biomedical research facility of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. It was founded in 1889 using money from a bequest of over $7 million by city merchant, banker/financier, civic leader and philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795-1873). Johns Hopkins Hospital and its school of medicine are considered to be the founding institutions of modern American medicine and the birthplace of numerous famous medical traditions including rounds, residents and house staff. Many medical specialties were formed at the hospital including neurosurgery, by Dr. Harvey Cushing; cardiac surgery by Dr. Alfred Blalock; and child psychiatry, by Dr. Leo Kanner.

Henrietta Lacks medical patient

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Donald Henderson American physician

Donald Ainslie Henderson was an American medical doctor, educator, and epidemiologist who directed a 10-year international effort (1967–1977) that eradicated smallpox throughout the world and launched international childhood vaccination programs. From 1977 to 1990, he was Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Later, he played a leading role in instigating national programs for public health preparedness and response following biological attacks and national disasters. At the time of his death, he was Professor and Dean Emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, as well as Distinguished Scholar at the UPMC Center for Health Security.

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Alex Turner musician, guitarist and composer

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William H. Welch American physician and scientist

William Henry Welch was an American physician, pathologist, bacteriologist, and medical school administrator. He was one of the "Big Four" founding professors at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was the first dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and was also the founder of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, the first school of public health in the country. Welch was more known for his cogent summations of current scientific work, than his own scientific research. The Johns Hopkins medical school library is also named after Welch. In his lifetime, he was called the "Dean of American Medicine" and received various awards and honors throughout his lifetime, and posthumously.

Michael Turner (footballer) British footballer

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<i>My Friend Irma</i> (film) 1950 film by George Marshall

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Thomas or Tom Turner may refer to:

The 2009 NBA draft was held on June 25, 2009, at the WaMu Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. In this draft, the National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players.

William Turner (anatomist) British anatomist

Sir William Turner was an English anatomist and was the Principal of the University of Edinburgh from 1903 to 1916.

Francis Turner (bishop) British bishop

Francis Turner D.D. was Bishop of Ely, one of the seven bishops who petitioned against the Declaration of Indulgence and one of the nine bishops who refused to take the oath of allegiance to William III.

Thomas Turner was an English royalist churchman and Dean of Canterbury.

Thomas H. Bender is an American historian, specializing in urban history and intellectual history. He joined New York University in 1974 and has served there as University Professor of the Humanities since 1982. He contributes regularly to the press, with articles published in the New York Times, The Nation, Los Angeles Times, Chronicle of Higher Education, and Newsday, among others. He retired in May 2015.

Robert C. Lieberman American academic

Robert C. Lieberman is an American political scientist and the former provost of the Johns Hopkins University. A scholar of American political development, Lieberman focuses primarily on race and politics and the American welfare state.

Thomas 'Tommy' Turner is an American politician and a Republican member of the Kentucky House of Representatives representing District 85 since January 1997.

References

  1. O'Connor, Anahad (2 October 2002). "Thomas Turner, 100, Hopkins Medical Dean". New York Times. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  2. "Thomas B. Turner, 1902-2002". The Gazette Online. 30 September 2002. Retrieved 25 August 2015.