Thomas Turner (president)

Last updated

Thomas Turner (September, 1645 – 29 April 1714) was an English churchman and academic, Archdeacon of Essex and President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

Corpus Christi College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Corpus Christi College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1517, it is the 12th oldest college in Oxford.

Life

The second son of Thomas Turner, Dean of Canterbury, he was born at Bristol on 19 or 20 September 1645; he was a younger brother of Francis Turner. Thomas originally matriculated at Hart Hall on 10 May 1662, but on 6 October 1663 he was admitted to a Gloucestershire scholarship at Corpus, of which he became fellow in 1672. He graduated B.A. on 15 March 1666, M.A. in 1669, B.D. in 1677, and D.D. in 1683.

Dean of Canterbury

The Dean of Canterbury is the head of the Chapter of the Cathedral of Christ Church, Canterbury, England. The current office of dean originated after the English Reformation, although Deans had also existed before this time; its immediate precursor office was the prior of the cathedral-monastery. The current Dean is Robert Willis, who was appointed in 2001 and is the 39th Dean since the Reformation, though the position of Dean and Prior as the religious head of the community is almost identical so the line is unbroken back to the time of the foundation of the community by Saint Augustine in AD 597.

Bristol City and county in England

Bristol is a city and county in South West England with a population of 463,400. The wider district has the 10th-largest population in England. The urban area population of 724,000 is the 8th-largest in the UK. The city borders North Somerset and South Gloucestershire, with the cities of Bath and Gloucester to the south-east and north-east, respectively. South Wales lies across the Severn estuary.

Francis Turner (bishop) British bishop

Francis Turner D.D. was Bishop of Ely, one of the seven bishops who petitioned against the Declaration of Indulgence and one of the nine bishops who refused to take the oath of allegiance to William III.

From 1672 to 1695 he was vicar of Milton, near Sittingbourne, Kent, and from 1680 to 1689 rector of Thorley, Hertfordshire. He became rector of Fulham, Middlesex, in 1688, archdeacon of Essex in 1680, canon of Ely in 1686, canon of St Paul's Cathedral in 1682, and precentor in 1690. These preferments, except the sinecure rectory of Fulham and the canonry and precentorship of St. Paul's, he resigned at or shortly after his election to the presidency of Corpus on 13 March 1688. The rapid election, which took place within a week of the death of his predecessor Robert Newlyn, diminished the chance of any interference from the court of James II.

Sittingbourne industrial town in Kent, England

Sittingbourne is an industrial town situated in the Swale district of Kent in south east England, 17 miles (27 km) from Canterbury and 45 miles (72 km) from London. The town sits beside the Roman Watling Street, an ancient British trackway used by the Romans and the Anglo-Saxons and next to the Swale, a strip of sea separating mainland Kent from the Isle of Sheppey. The town became prominent after the death of Thomas Becket in 1170, since it provided a convenient resting point on the road from London to Canterbury and Dover.

Kent County of England

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west. The county also shares borders with Essex along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais through the Channel Tunnel. The county town is Maidstone.

Thorley, Hertfordshire village in Hertfordshire

Thorley is a village and civil parish in East Hertfordshire district of Hertfordshire, England. The parish includes the hamlets of Thorley Street, Thorley Wash and Old Thorley, and is bordered at the north by the market town of Bishop's Stortford.

Turner reformed the college and spent his own money on it. In 1706 he began what are now the Fellows' buildings, to a design attributed to Henry Aldrich. They were completed in 1712. Turner died on 29 April 1714, and is buried in the college chapel, where, as also at Stowe Nine Churches in Northamptonshire, there is a lengthy inscription about his bequests. These included a major benefaction to the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy.

Henry Aldrich Theologian, philosopher, architect, and poet

Henry Aldrich was an English theologian, philosopher, and composer.

Stowe Nine Churches is a civil parish incorporating the settlements of Church Stowe and Upper Stowe in the English county of Northamptonshire. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 259.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

Turner was, from the hints of Thomas Hearne, suspected of Jacobite sympathies, but on very slender grounds. His publication was a sermon preached at Whitehall on 29 May 1685 before James II, to whom he was chaplain. In this sermon there is criticism of Thomas Hobbes's position, that a 'state of nature is a state of war.'

Thomas Hearne (antiquarian) English antiquary and historian

Thomas Hearne or Hearn was an English diarist and prolific antiquary, particularly remembered for his published editions of many medieval English chronicles and other important historical texts.

Jacobitism political ideology

Jacobitism is the name of the political movement in Great Britain and Ireland that aims to restore the House of Stuart to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The movement is named after Jacobus, the Latin form of James.

Thomas Hobbes 17th-century English philosopher

Thomas Hobbes, in some older texts Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, was an English philosopher, considered to be one of the founders of modern political philosophy. Hobbes is best known for his 1651 book Leviathan, which expounded an influential formulation of social contract theory. In addition to political philosophy, Hobbes also contributed to a diverse array of other fields, including history, jurisprudence, geometry, the physics of gases, theology, ethics, and general philosophy.

Related Research Articles

Francis Windebank English politician

Sir Francis Windebank was an English politician who was Secretary of State under Charles I.

Peter Mews Theologian and bishop

Peter Mews was an English Royalist theologian and bishop.

Thomas Holland (translator) English Calvinist scholar and theologian, one of the translators of the King James Version of the Bible

Thomas Holland was an English Calvinist scholar and theologian, and one of the translators of the King James Version of the Bible.

Richard Rawlins was Bishop of St David's between the years 1523 and 1536.

William Lloyd (Bishop of Worcester) English Bishop

William Lloyd was an English divine who served successively as bishop of St Asaph, of Lichfield and Coventry and of Worcester.

Richard Smalbroke Anglican Bishop

Richard Smalbroke was an English churchman, Bishop of St David's and then of Lichfield and Coventry.

Henry Cole was an English Roman Catholic churchman and academic.

George Stradling was Dean of Chichester Cathedral from 1672 until his death.

Henry Wilkinson (1610–1675) was an English clergyman, in the Commonwealth period a canon of Christ Church, Oxford, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity, and member of the Westminster Assembly. Later he was a nonconformist preacher.

Samuel Bradford English bishop

Samuel Bradford was an English churchman and whig, bishop successively of Carlisle and Rochester.

Thomas Marshall was an English churchman and linguist, Rector of Lincoln College, Oxford and Dean of Gloucester.

Robert Grove (bishop) British bishop

Robert Grove (1634–1696) was an English Bishop of Chichester.

Thomas Turner was an English royalist churchman and Dean of Canterbury.

William Stanley (priest) British priest

William Stanley (1647–1731) was an English churchman and college head, Master of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Archdeacon of London and Dean of St Asaph.

Thomas Manningham (1651?-1722) was an English churchman, bishop of Chichester from 1709.

Thomas Bedyll was a divine and royal servant. He was royal chaplain and clerk of the Privy Council of Henry VIII, assisting him with the separation from Rome.

Anthony Hamilton (Archdeacon of Colchester) Archdeacon of Colchester

Anthony Hamilton (1739–1812) was an English Anglican priest, Archdeacon of Colchester from 1775.

References

The public domain consists of all the creative work to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

<i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> Multi-volume reference work

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.

Academic offices
Preceded by
Robert Newlyn
President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford
1688-1714
Succeeded by
Basil Kennett