Thomas Tyrrell

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Sir Thomas Tyrrell (23 June 1594 – 8 March 1672) was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1659 and 1660. He fought on the Parliamentarian side in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War Civil war in England (1642–1651)

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") principally over the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Tyrrill was the son of Sir Edward Tyrrill of Thornton Hall, Buckinghamshire and his second wife Margaret Aston, daughter of Thomas Aston of Aston Cheshire. [1] He was admitted to the Inner Temple in 1612 and was called to the Bar on 13 November 1621. In 1642, he was Deputy Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. [2] In the Civil War he was a captain, and later colonel of horse in the Parliamentarian Army under Bedford and Essex. [1] He fought at the battle of Lostwithiel in 1644.

Inner Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honorable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as the Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

In 1659 Tyrrell was elected Member of Parliament for Aylesbury in the Third Protectorate Parliament. [3] In the same year he was admitted as a Bencher and became joint Commissioner of the Great Seal, and Sergeant at Law. In 1660 he was elected MP for Buckinghamshire in the Convention Parliament. [3] He was knighted on 16 July 1660, [4] and appointed Justice of the Court of Common Pleas on 27 July 1660. He was on the commission for the trial of the regicides, but took no active part. In 1667, following the Great Fire of London he was one of the twenty two judges appointed to resolve property disputes arising from the rebuilding the city. Portraits of the judges were put up in the Guildhall by the city in gratitude for their services. [5]

Aylesbury (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Aylesbury is a constituency created in 1553 — created as a single-member seat in 1885 — represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom since 1992 by David Lidington, of the Conservative Party.

Third Protectorate Parliament

The Third Protectorate Parliament sat for one session, from 27 January 1659 until 22 April 1659, with Chaloner Chute and Thomas Bampfylde as the Speakers of the House of Commons. It was a bicameral Parliament, with an Upper House having a power of veto over the Commons.

Buckinghamshire is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885.

Tyrrell died aged 78 and was buried at Castlethorpe Church. [6]

Tyrrell married a daughter of —Saunders of Buckinghamshire. Their son Peter became a baronet. [1] Tyrrell married thirdly Bridget Harington, daughter of Sir Edward Harington of Ridlington, Rutland. [6]

Sir Edward Harington of Ridlington, English landowner.

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