Thomas Updegraff

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From October 1894's Midland Monthly magazine Thomas Updegraff (Iowa Congressman).jpg
From October 1894's Midland Monthly magazine

Thomas Updegraff (April 3, 1834 – October 4, 1910) was an attorney and five-term Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from northeastern Iowa. His two periods of service were separated by ten years out of Congress.

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Iowa State of the United States of America

Iowa is a state in the Midwestern United States, bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and the Missouri River and Big Sioux River to the west. It is bordered by six states; Wisconsin to the northeast, Illinois to the east, Missouri to the south, Nebraska to the west, South Dakota to the northwest and Minnesota to the north.

Contents

Early life

Miss Updegraff, daughter of Thomas Updegraff Miss Thomas Updegraff.jpg
Miss Updegraff, daughter of Thomas Updegraff

Updegraff, a descendant of the German Op den Graeff family, was born in Tioga County, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of Notre Dame, then moved to Iowa.

Tioga County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Tioga County is a county located on the central northern border of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 41,981. Its county seat is Wellsboro. The county was created on March 26, 1804, from part of Lycoming County and later organized in 1812. It is named for the Tioga River.

University of Notre Dame Private Catholic university in Notre Dame, Indiana, United States

The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a private Catholic research university in Notre Dame, Indiana. The main campus covers 1,261 acres (510 ha) in a suburban setting and it contains a number of recognizable landmarks, such as the Golden Dome, the Word of Life mural, the Notre Dame Stadium, and the Basilica. The school was founded on November 26, 1842, by Edward Sorin, who was also its first president.

He was the clerk of the district court of Clayton County, Iowa, from 1856 to 1860. After studying law, he was admitted to the bar in 1860 and commenced practice in McGregor, Iowa.

Clayton County, Iowa County in the United States

Clayton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,129. Its county seat is Elkader. The county was established in 1837 and was named in honor of John M. Clayton, United States Senator from Delaware and later Secretary of State under President Zachary Taylor.

McGregor, Iowa City in Iowa, United States

McGregor is a city in Clayton County, Iowa, United States. The population was 871 at the 2010 census. McGregor is located on the Mississippi River across from Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. Pike's Peak State Park is located just south of the city. Just to the north of McGregor is the city of Marquette. The community of McGregor Heights lies in the southern parts of the city limits.

Political career

In 1878 he began to serve as a member of the Iowa House of Representatives. In November of the same year, he was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives from Iowa's 3rd congressional district, which was then made up of the seven counties in Iowa's northeastern corner. [1] Two years later he was re-elected to a second term. The following year the Iowa General Assembly reapportioned the congressional districts to accommodate the addition of two additional seats, placing Updegraff's home county in a reconfigured 4th congressional district. [1] He won the Republican Party's nomination in 1882. [2] However, in the general election he was defeated by Luman Hamlin Weller of the United States Greenback Party. Updegraff had served Iowa's 3rd congressional district from March 4, 1879 to March 3, 1883.

Iowa House of Representatives lower chamber of the Iowa state legislature

The Iowa House of Representatives is the lower house of the Iowa General Assembly, the upper house being the Iowa Senate. There are 100 seats in the Iowa House of Representatives, representing 100 single-member districts across the state, formed by dividing the 50 Senate districts in half. Each district has a population of approximately 30,464 as of the 2010 United States Census. The House of Representatives meets at the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines.

Iowas 3rd congressional district congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa

Iowa's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers its southwest quadrant, roughly an area including Des Moines to the borders with Nebraska and Missouri.

Iowa General Assembly legislature of the US state of Iowa

The Iowa General Assembly (IGA) is the legislative branch of the state government of Iowa. Like the federal United States Congress, the General Assembly is a bicameral body, composed of the upper house Iowa Senate and the lower Iowa House of Representatives respectively. The Senate consists of four year terms and the House consists of two year terms. The General Assembly convenes within the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines.

Returning to Iowa, Updegraff was a member of the McGregor Board of Education, and the city solicitor. He was a delegate to the 1888 Republican National Convention.

The 1888 Republican National Convention was a presidential nominating convention held at the Auditorium Building in Chicago, Illinois, on June 19–25, 1888. It resulted in the nomination of former Senator Benjamin Harrison of Indiana for President and Levi P. Morton of New York, a former Congressman and Minister to France, for Vice President. During the convention, Frederick Douglass was invited to speak and became the first African-American to have his name put forward for a presidential nomination in a major party's roll call vote; he received one vote from Kentucky on the fourth ballot.

In 1892, he again ran for Congress in Iowa's 4th district, winning not only the Republican nomination but also the general election (where he defeated incumbent Democrat Walter Halben Butler). He was re-elected to two more terms. However, in 1898, he was defeated in his bid for the Republican nomination by Gilbert N. Haugen, who would go on to serve seventeen consecutive terms. In all, Updegraff served the 4th congressional district from March 4, 1893 to March 3, 1899.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

Walter Halben Butler American politician

Walter Halben Butler was a lawyer, teacher, newspaper publisher, and one-term Democratic U.S. Representative from Iowa's 4th congressional district, then located in northeastern Iowa.

Gilbert N. Haugen American politician

Gilbert Nelson Haugen was a seventeen-term Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 4th congressional district, then located in northeastern Iowa. For nearly five years, he was the longest-serving member of the House. Born before the American Civil War, and first elected to Congress in the 19th century, Haugen served until his defeat in the 1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt landslide.

After Congress

Updegraff then returned to McGregor to resume the practice of law. He died in McGregor, and was interred there in Pleasant Grove Cemetery.

Family

In 1858, Updegraff married Laura A. Platt of Huron County, Ohio. [3] She died in 1865, [4] and he later married Florence Haight. They were the parents of two daughters, Elizabeth and Rachel.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Iowa congressional district maps, 1847-2013 Archived 2008-06-30 at the Wayback Machine ," accessed 2009-04-17.
  2. "Congressional Nominations," New York Times, 1882-07-28 at p. 5.
  3. Price, Realto E. (1916). History of Clayton County, Iowa. 1. Chicago, IL: Robert O. Law Company. p. 408.
  4. History of Clayton County, Iowa, p. 411.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Theodore W. Burdick
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Iowa's 3rd congressional district

18791883
Succeeded by
David B. Henderson
Preceded by
Walter H. Butler
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Iowa's 4th congressional district

18931899
Succeeded by
Gilbert N. Haugen