Thomas Van Swearingen

Last updated
United States Congress. "Thomas Van Swearingen (id: V000059)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress .
Thomas Van Swearingen
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Virginia's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1819 August 19, 1822
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 2nd congressional district

1819–1822
Succeeded by

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