Thomas Vernon (died 1556)

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Thomas Vernon (by 1532 – 4 June 1556) was an English politician. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Shropshire in March 1553. He married Dorothy, daughter of Sir Francis Lovell of Barton Bendish and East Harling, Norfolk. [1]

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References

  1. "VERNON, Thomas (by 1532-56). - History of Parliament Online". www.historyofparliamentonline.org.