Thomas Vigne

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Thomas Vigne (1771 in England 30 March 1841 at Woodford Wells, Essex) was an English amateur cricketer.

Woodford Wells area of Woodford, in outer east London

Woodford Wells is an old hamlet now part of the northeastern suburbs of London, England, in the district of Woodford, about 0.5 miles (0.80 km) north of Woodford Green and on the edge of Epping Forest.

Essex County of England

Essex is a county in the south-east of England, north-east of London. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and London to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, the only city in the county. For government statistical purposes Essex is placed in the East of England region.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Contents

Career

He was mainly associated with Surrey and he made 60 known appearances in first-class matches from 1804 to 1832. [1] He was an occasional wicketkeeper.

Surrey county cricket teams have been traced back to the 17th century, but Surrey's involvement in cricket goes back much further than that. The first definite mention of cricket anywhere in the world is dated c.1550 in Guildford.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

Vigne's son was Godfrey Vigne who played first-class cricket from 1819 to 1845.

Godfrey Thomas Vigne was an English amateur cricketer and traveller.

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References

  1. Arthur Haygarth, Scores & Biographies, Volume 1 (1744-1826), Lillywhite, 1862

External sources