Thomas W. Hyde

Last updated
Thomas W. Hyde
Born(1841-01-16)January 16, 1841
Florence, Italy
Died December 14, 1899(1899-12-14) (aged 58)
Fort Monroe, Virginia
Place of burialOak Grove Cemetery, Bath, Maine
Allegiance United States of America
Union
Service/branch United States Army
Union Army
Years of service 1861 - 1865
Rank Union Army colonel rank insignia.png Colonel
Union Army major general rank insignia.svg Brevet Major General
Unit 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Commands held 1st Maine Veteran Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Battles/wars American Civil War
*Second Battle of Bull Run
*Battle of Antietam
*Battle of Gettysburg
AwardsMedal of Honor ribbon.svg Medal of Honor
Other work Senator, Mayor, Founder of Bath Iron Works

Thomas Worcester Hyde (January 16, 1841 – December 14, 1899) was a Union Army colonel who subsequently received brevets of brigadier general of volunteers and major general of volunteers in the American Civil War, a state senator from Maine, and the founder of Bath Iron Works, one of the major shipyards in the United States. He wrote two books about his experiences during the war and at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Union Army Land force that fought for the Union during the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the Union Army referred to the United States Army, the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states. Also known as the Federal Army, it proved essential to the preservation of the United States of America as a working, viable republic.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Maine Senate

The Maine Senate is the upper house of the Maine Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maine. The Senate currently consists of 35 members representing an equal number of districts across the state, though the Maine Constitution allows for "an odd number of Senators, not less than 31 nor more than 35". Unlike the lower House, the Senate does not set aside nonvoting seats for Native tribes. Because it is a part-time position, members of the Maine Senate usually have outside employment as well.

Contents

Biography

Born in Florence, Italy, to parents who were natives of Bath, Maine, Hyde graduated from Bowdoin College in 1861 and then from Chicago University. [1]

Florence Comune in Tuscany, Italy

Florence is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,084 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

Bath, Maine City in Maine, United States

Bath is a city in Sagadahoc County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 8,514 at the 2010 census, and 8,357 as of 2013, the population has had a change of -10.2% since 2000. It is the county seat of Sagadahoc County, which includes one city and 10 towns. The city is popular with tourists, many drawn by its 19th-century architecture. It is home to the Bath Iron Works and Heritage Days Festival, held annually on the Fourth of July weekend. It is commonly known as "The City of Ships". Bath is part of the metropolitan statistical area of Greater Portland.

Hyde began his Union Army service on April 2, 1861, as a major in the 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment. [2] On February 26, 1863, he became Assistant Inspector General of the Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac, which was commanded by Major General William F. "Baldy" Smith. [2] [3] He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on December 1, 1863. [2] In 1864, he became provost marshal general of the Sixth Corps. [2] [4] On September 24, 1864, Hyde transferred to the 1st Maine Veteran Volunteer Infantry Regiment and was promoted to colonel on October 22, 1864. [2] Hyde commanded Brigade 3, Division 2, VI Corps of the Army of the Shenandoah between October 30, 1864, and December 6, 1864, and the same brigade in the Army of the Potomac from December 6, 1864, when the Army of the Shenandoah returned from its detached duty to the Army of the Potomac, until June 28, 1865. [2] Despite this service, Hyde did not receive promotion to full rank brigadier general. [2] [3]

The 7th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It participated in most of the campaigns and battles of the Army of the Potomac in the Eastern Theater.

VI Corps (Union Army) formation of the Union (North) during the American Civil War

The VI Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Army of the Potomac unit of the Union Army during the American Civil War

The Army of the Potomac was the principal Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War. It was created in July 1861 shortly after the First Battle of Bull Run and was disbanded in May 1865 following the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in April.

While serving under Major General John Sedgwick early in the war, Hyde was present at several key Civil War battles, including the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Antietam (for which he later received the Medal of Honor), [2] and the Battle of Gettysburg. He was also present at Confederate General Robert E. Lee's 1865 surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. Hyde was mustered out of the volunteer army on June 28, 1865. [2]

John Sedgwick Union Army general

John Sedgwick was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War.

Second Battle of Bull Run Major battle of the American Civil War

The Second Battle of Bull Run or Battle of Second Manassas was fought August 28–30, 1862 in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War. It was the culmination of the Northern Virginia Campaign waged by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia against Union Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia, and a battle of much larger scale and numbers than the First Battle of Bull Run fought on July 21, 1861 on the same ground.

Battle of Antietam major battle of the American Civil War, bloodiest single day in American history

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the Southern United States, was a battle of the American Civil War, fought on September 17, 1862, between Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and Union General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and Antietam Creek. Part of the Maryland Campaign, it was the first field army–level engagement in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War to take place on Union soil. It was the bloodiest day in United States history, with a combined tally of 22,717 dead, wounded, or missing.

On January 13, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Hyde for appointment as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers to rank from April 2, 1865, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on March 12, 1866. [5] On February 17, 1869, President Johnson nominated Hyde for the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from April 2, 1865, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on March 3, 1869, one of the last brevet major general awards for Civil War service. [6]

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

President of the United States (POTUS) is the title for the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Andrew Johnson 17th president of the United States

Andrew Johnson was the 17th president of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869. Johnson assumed the presidency as he was vice president of the United States at the time of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. A Democrat who ran with Lincoln on the National Union ticket, Johnson came to office as the Civil War concluded. He favored quick restoration of the seceded states to the Union. His plans did not give protection to the former slaves; he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, culminating in his impeachment by the House of Representatives. He was acquitted in the Senate by one vote. Johnson's main accomplishment as president is the Alaska purchase.

In many of the world's military establishments, a brevet was a warrant giving a commissioned officer a higher rank title as a reward for gallantry or meritorious conduct but without conferring the authority, precedence, or pay of real rank. An officer so promoted was referred to as being brevetted. The promotion would be noted in the officer's title.

Starting in 1873, Hyde served three terms in the Maine Senate, including two as president. He became mayor of Bath in 1878.

In 1884, he founded Bath Iron Works and became general manager of it in 1888. Since it was founded, the shipyard has executed more than 425 shipbuilding contracts, including 245 for the U.S. Navy.

Hyde wrote Following the Greek Cross (1894) and Recollections of the Battle of Gettysburg (1898). [2]

Hyde died on November 15, 1899 at Fort Monroe, Virginia, after a short illness. [1] [2] He was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, Bath, Maine. [2]

Medal of Honor citation

Rank and organization: Major, 7th Maine Infantry. Place and date: At Antietam, Md., 17 September 1862. Entered service at: Bath, Maine. Birth: Italy. Date of issue: 8 April 1891. His citation read:

Led his regiment in an assault on a strong body of the enemy's infantry and kept up the fight until the greater part of his men had been killed or wounded, bringing the remainder safely out of the fight. [2]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 New York Times obituary, November 15, 1899
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher, Civil War High Commands. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN   0-8047-3641-3. p. 312
  3. 1 2 Hunt, Roger D. and Jack R. Brown, Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue. Gaithersburg, MD: Olde Soldier Books, Inc., 1990. ISBN   1-56013-002-4. p. 307
  4. Neither the Eichers nor Hunt and Brown give the exact date of this appointment.
  5. Eicher, 2001, p. 749
  6. Eicher, 2001, p. 713

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References

Why no photo? I have one (from my copy of his 1894 book, now out-of-copyright) that would do well, were I able to post it...