Thomas Wade (writer)

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Thomas Wade (1805 – 19 September 1875) was an English poet and dramatist.

Contents

Life

Wade, known in early life as Wade Lavender, was born at Woodbridge, Suffolk. He went to London at a young age, where he began to publish verse influenced by Byron, Keats and especially Shelley. He wrote some plays that were produced on the London stage with the benefit of the acting of Charles and Fanny Kemble.

Woodbridge, Suffolk town in Suffolk, England

Woodbridge is a town in Suffolk, East Anglia, England, about 8 miles (13 km) from the sea coast. It lies along the River Deben and has a population of about 11,000. The town is served by Woodbridge railway station on the East Suffolk Line. It lies within a short distance of the wider Ipswich urban area. Woodbridge is close to some of the major archaeological sites for the Anglo-Saxon period, one of which includes the Sutton Hoo burial ship. The town's 1100 years of recorded history have bequeathed a variety of historical architecture. There are facilities for boating and for riverside walks.

Lord Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, known simply as Lord Byron, was an English poet, peer, and politician who became a revolutionary in the Greek War of Independence, and is considered one of the historical leading figures of the Romantic movement of his era. He is regarded as one of the greatest English poets and remains widely read and influential. Among his best-known works are the lengthy narrative poems Don Juan and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage; many of his shorter lyrics in Hebrew Melodies also became popular.

John Keats English Romantic poet

John Keats was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his works having been in publication for only four years before his death from tuberculosis at the age of 25.

Wade contributed verse to magazines, and for some years he was editor as well as part-proprietor of Bell's Weekly Messenger . When it proved financially unsuccessful, he retired to Jersey, where he edited the British Press, continuing to publish poetry until 1871. He died in Jersey on 19 September 1875. His wife was Lucy Eager, a musician.

Bell's Weekly Messenger was a British Sunday newspaper that began publication on 1 May 1796, under proprietorship of John Bell. Initially a Sunday paper, from 1799 the London edition was reprinted on Monday for nationwide distribution. By 1803, it was selling 6,000 copies a week, at sixpence a copy. In 1799 there was even an augmented reprint of the previous year's editions, under the title Bell's Annual Messenger, printed for international distribution under the auspices of the East India Company.

Jersey British Crown Dependency

Jersey, officially the Bailiwick of Jersey, is a British Crown dependency located near the coast of Normandy, France. It is the second closest of the Channel Islands to France, after Alderney.

Works

The most notable of Wade's publications were:

Covent Garden district in London, England

Covent Garden is a district in London, on the eastern fringes of the West End, between St Martin's Lane and Drury Lane. It is associated with the former fruit-and-vegetable market in the central square, now a popular shopping and tourist site, and with the Royal Opera House, which itself may be referred to as "Covent Garden". The district is divided by the main thoroughfare of Long Acre, north of which is given over to independent shops centred on Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, while the south contains the central square with its street performers and most of the historical buildings, theatres and entertainment facilities, including the London Transport Museum and the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

Farce Comedy genre

In theatre, a farce is a comedy that aims at entertaining the audience through situations that are highly exaggerated, extravagant, and thus improbable. Farce is also characterized by physical humor, the use of deliberate absurdity or nonsense, and broadly stylized performances. It is also often set in one particular location, where all events occur. Farces have been written for the stage and film.

The Monthly Repository was a British monthly Unitarian periodical which ran between 1806 and 1838. In terms of editorial policy on theology, the Repository was largely concerned with rational dissent. Considered as a political journal, it was radical, supporting a platform of: abolition of monopolies ; abolition of slavery; repeal of "taxes on knowledge"; extension of suffrage; national education; reform of the Church of England; and changes to the Poor Laws.

Wade also wrote a drama entitled King Henry II, and a translation of Dante's Inferno in the metre of the original, both unpublished; and a series of sonnets inspired by his wife, some published.

Dante Alighieri Italian poet

Durante di Alighiero degli Alighieri, commonly known by his pen name Dante Alighieri or simply as Dante, was an Italian poet. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa and later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.

Sonnet form of poetry with fourteen lines; by the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure

A sonnet is a poetic form which originated at the Court of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in Palermo, Sicily. The 13th century poet and notary Giacomo da Lentini is credited with the sonnet's invention and the Sicilian School of poets who surrounded him is credited with its spread. The earliest sonnets, however, no longer survive in the original Sicilian dialect, but only after being translated into Tuscan dialect.

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References

The public domain consists of all the creative work to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

<i>Encyclopædia Britannica</i> Eleventh Edition 1910 Encyclopedia

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