Thomas Walker (Australian politician)

Last updated

Thomas Walker Thomas Walker.jpg
Thomas Walker

Thomas Walker (5 February 1858 10 May 1932) was an Australian politician, a member of two different state parliaments.

Walker was born in Preston, Lancashire, England, the son of corn miller and merchant Thomas Walker, and Ellen née Eccles. He was educated at Leyland Grammar School, then worked as a schoolteacher at Preston for two years. He then emigrated to Canada, where he worked as a farmhand and chemist's assistant. After returning to the United Kingdom he work as a journalist on the Preston Herald . He later spent some time in Toledo, Ohio, U.S., where he spent 1876 lecturing on evolution and the occult. The following year he toured through New South Wales, England and South Africa, lecturing on spiritualism and politics. While in South Africa in 1881, he married Andrietta Maria Somers, with whom he would have two sons and two daughters.

Walker returned to Australia in 1882, spending some time in Victoria before settling in New South Wales. He became a prominent public figure through his political lectures, in which he argued for secularism and an immediate separation of New South Wales from England. In February 1885 he played a prominent role in a meeting held to discuss British government policy towards the Pacific Islands, and shortly afterwards he was involved in opposing the deployment of New South Wales troops to the Sudan.

On 17 February 1887 Walker was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Northumberland as a Protectionist. [1] He continued to push for separation from England, helping to form the short-lived Republican Union and Republican League. He held his Legislative Assembly seat until the election of 25 June 1894, when he unsuccessfully contested the seat of Wallsend. He contested the seat again the following year without success.

Some time after 1894, Walker visited New Zealand, where he taught elocution, promoted temperance, lectured on various subjects, and wrote for the press. On returning to New South Wales he unsuccessfully contested the seat of Sturt in 1898.

In 1899, Walker emigrated to Western Australia. He found work as a journalist with the Sunday Times in Perth, and later with the Kalgoorlie newspapers Sun and Kalgoorlie Miner . He became editor of the Sunday Times in 1901, and was also editor of the Sun until 1905.

On 27 October 1905, Walker was elected to the Western Australian Legislative Assembly seat of Kanowna on a Labor ticket. He would hold the seat until his death over 25 years later. From around 1906 he began studying law, and in 1911 was admitted to the Western Australian bar. He was a member of the Senate of the University of Western Australia from 1912 to 1916.

When the Labor party won government under John Scaddan on 7 October 1911, Walker was appointed Minister for Justice and Education, and Attorney General. He held both portfolios until the Scaddan government's defeat on 27 July 1916. He was Speaker of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly from 24 July 1924 to 29 July 1930. He died at Inglewood on 10 May 1932, [1] and was buried in Karrakatta Cemetery [ citation needed ].

Related Research Articles

Hal Colebatch politician from Western Australia

Sir Harry Pateshall Colebatch CMG was a long-serving and occasionally controversial figure in Western Australian politics. He was a member of the Western Australian Legislative Council for nearly 20 years, the twelfth Premier of Western Australia for a month in 1919, agent-general in London for five years, and a federal senator for four years.

John Scaddan Australian politician; 10th Premier of Western Australia

John Scaddan, CMG, popularly known as "Happy Jack", was Premier of Western Australia from 7 October 1911 until 27 July 1916.

John Lutey politician

John Thomas Lutey was the Labor Party member for the Western Australian Legislative Assembly seat of Brownhill-Ivanhoe from 1917 to 1932.

The Electoral district of Brown Hill-Ivanhoe was a Legislative Assembly electorate in the state of Western Australia. It covered part of the Goldfields city of Boulder, near Kalgoorlie, and neighbouring mining areas. It was created at the 1911 redistribution out of the former seats of Brown Hill and Ivanhoe, and was first contested at the 1911 election. It was abolished in the 1948 redistribution, with its area split between the neighbouring electorates of Boulder and Hannans, taking effect from the 1950 election. The seat was a very safe one for the Labor Party.

Electoral district of Pilbara state electoral district of Western Australia

The Electoral district of Pilbara is a Legislative Assembly electorate in the state of Western Australia. Pilbara is named for the region of Western Australia in which it is located. It is one of the oldest electorates in Western Australia, with its first member having been elected to the Second Parliament of the Legislative Assembly at the 1894 elections.

William Carpenter (Australian politician) Australian politician

William Henry Carpenter was an Australian politician. He held seats in three parliaments: the South Australian Legislative Assembly, the Australian House of Representatives and the Western Australian Legislative Assembly.

Edward Heitmann politician

Edward Ernest Heitmann, was an Australian politician and member of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly from 1904 to 1917, then a member of the Australian House of Representatives until 1919.

William Butcher 1543

William James Burchell Butcher, Australian politician, was a Member of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly for twelve years.

John Kirwan (politician) Australian journalist and politician

Sir John Waters Kirwan, KCMG was the President of the Western Australian Legislative Council and first Federal member for Kalgoorlie in the Australian House of Representatives.

Thomas Gregory Stephens was an Australian parliamentarian.

George Foley Australian politician

George James Foley was an Australian politician from Western Australia. He was the member for the Western Australian seat of Mount Leonora from 1911 until 1920, initially for the Labor Party until 1917 when he joined the National Labor Party. He then entered the Federal House of Representatives as the Nationalist member for the seat of Kalgoorlie, which he held until 1922.

This is a list of members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly between the 1914 election and the 1917 election, together known as the Ninth Parliament. The re-election of Premier John Scaddan's Labor Government with a 26-24 majority in 1914 was tempered when, a year later, Labor member Joseph Gardiner's seat was declared vacant on account of his non-attendance and a Liberal was elected in his stead, and Labor became a minority government when on 18 December 1915, Edward Johnston resigned from the Labor Party and became an independent. On 27 July 1916, the Scaddan Ministry was defeated and the Liberals' Frank Wilson became the new Premier.

This is a list of members of the Western Australian Legislative Assembly between the 1917 election and the 1921 election, together known as the 10th Parliament.

Benjamin Cribb Australian politician

Benjamin Cribb was an Australian businessman and politician. He was an unaligned Member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for one term in 1858–1859 and a Member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly in 1861–1867 and again in 1870-1873.

Francis Willmott (1870-1941) orchardist and politician

Francis Edward Sykes Willmott was an Australian politician who was a member of both houses of the Parliament of Western Australia, serving in the Legislative Assembly from 1914 to 1921, and then in the Legislative Council from 1921 to 1926. He was the leader of the Country Party from 1915 to 1919.

Arthur Male was an Australian businessman and politician who was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1905 to 1917, representing the seat of Kimberley. He was a minister in the first government of Frank Wilson.

Walter Dwyer (1875-1950) lawyer

Sir Walter Dwyer was an Australian lawyer, politician, and judge. He was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1911 to 1914, and later serving as the presiding judge on the State Court of Arbitration from 1926 to 1945.

Norbert Keenan (1864-1954) lawyer and politician

Sir Norbert Michael Keenan QC was an Australian lawyer and politician who was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1905 to 1911 and again from 1930 to 1950. He was the leader of the Nationalist Party from 1933 to 1938, during the time when it was the junior partner in the coalition with the Country Party. Keenan had earlier served as a minister in the government of Newton Moore and the second government of Sir James Mitchell.

Austin Alvis Horan was an Australian politician who was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Western Australia from 1904 to 1911, representing the seat of Yilgarn.

References

  1. 1 2 "Mr Thomas Walker (2) (1858-1932)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2019.
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Joseph Creer
Ninian Melville
Member for Northumberland
1887–1894
Served alongside: Creer/Edden, Melville
Succeeded by
Richard Stevenson
Western Australian Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Robert Hastie
Member for Kanowna
1905–1932
Succeeded by
Emil Nulsen