Thomas Walker Huey House

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Thomas Walker Huey House
Thomas Walker Huey House.jpg
Thomas Walker Huey House, July 2012
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LocationJunction of South Carolina Highways 200 and 285, near Lancaster, South Carolina
Coordinates 34°48′54″N80°43′1″W / 34.81500°N 80.71694°W / 34.81500; -80.71694 Coordinates: 34°48′54″N80°43′1″W / 34.81500°N 80.71694°W / 34.81500; -80.71694
Area2.4 acres (0.97 ha)
Built1847 (1847)-1848
Architectural styleGreek Revival
MPS Lancaster County MPS
NRHP reference # 89002146 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 4, 1990

Thomas Walker Huey House is a historic home located near Lancaster, Lancaster County, South Carolina. It was built in 1847–48, and is a simple, two-story, clapboard-sided, Greek Revival style dwelling . It has a full-façade one-story shed roof porch. Thomas Walker Huey (1798-1854) was a prominent 19th century merchant, planter, and politician. [2] [3]

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. J. Tracy Power and Frank Brown, III (July 1989). "Thomas Walker Huey House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved June 2014.Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  3. "Thomas Walker Huey House, Lancaster County (S.C. Hwy. 200 and S.C. Sec. Rd. 285, Lancaster vicinity)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved June 2014.Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)