Thomas Walker Huey House

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Thomas Walker Huey House
Thomas Walker Huey House.jpg
Thomas Walker Huey House, July 2012
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Location Junction of South Carolina Highways 200 and 285, near Lancaster, South Carolina
Coordinates 34°48′54″N80°43′1″W / 34.81500°N 80.71694°W / 34.81500; -80.71694 Coordinates: 34°48′54″N80°43′1″W / 34.81500°N 80.71694°W / 34.81500; -80.71694
Area 2.4 acres (0.97 ha)
Built 1847 (1847)-1848
Architectural style Greek Revival
MPS Lancaster County MPS
NRHP reference # 89002146 [1]
Added to NRHP January 4, 1990

Thomas Walker Huey House is a historic home located near Lancaster, Lancaster County, South Carolina. It was built in 1847-48, and is a simple, two-story, clapboard-sided, Greek Revival style dwelling . It has a full-façade one-story shed roof porch. Thomas Walker Huey (1798-1854) was a prominent 19th century merchant, planter, and politician. [2] [3]

Lancaster, South Carolina City in South Carolina, United States

The city of Lancaster is the county seat of Lancaster County, South Carolina, United States, located in the Charlotte Metropolitan Area. As of the United States Census of 2010, the city population was 9,134 but due to South Carolina's strict annexation laws its actual population is well over twenty thousand people. The city was named after the famous House of Lancaster.

Lancaster County, South Carolina County in the United States

Lancaster County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2017 census estimate, its population was 92,550. Its county seat is Lancaster, which has an urban population of 23,979. The county was created in 1785.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. J. Tracy Power and Frank Brown, III (July 1989). "Thomas Walker Huey House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved June 2014.Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  3. "Thomas Walker Huey House, Lancaster County (S.C. Hwy. 200 and S.C. Sec. Rd. 285, Lancaster vicinity)". National Register Properties in South Carolina. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Retrieved June 2014.Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)