Thomas Wallace (Irish MP)

Last updated

Thomas Wallace (13 April 1765 – 9 January 1847) was an Irish Liberal Party politician who sat in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom as a Member of Parliament (MP) for Yarmouth from 1827 to 1830, from 1831 to 1835 for Drogheda and then for County Carlow. [1] [2]

Liberal Party (UK) political party of the United Kingdom, 1859–1988

The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s. By the end of the 19th century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons, officially the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Owing to shortage of space, its office accommodation extends into Portcullis House.

Yarmouth was a borough constituency of the House of Commons of England then of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two members of parliament (MPs), elected by the bloc vote system.

Wallace was a Dublin barrister. He stood unsuccessfully at Drogheda at the general elections in 1818, [3] [4] 1820, [3] 1826 [3] before being elected as a Tory for Yarmouth at a by-election in August 1827. [5] He held the Yarmouth seat until the 1830 general election, [6] when he did not defend the seat. [5] He contested Drogheda again in 1831, [3] before winning the seat at an unopposed by-election in October 1831. [7]

Dublin capital and largest city in Ireland

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. It is on the east coast of Ireland, in the province of Leinster, at the mouth of the River Liffey, and is bordered on the south by the Wicklow Mountains. It has an urban area population of 1,173,179, while the population of the Dublin Region, as of 2016, was 1,347,359, and the population of the Greater Dublin Area was 1,904,806.

Drogheda was a parliamentary borough constituency in Ireland, which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was an original constituency represented in Parliament when the Union of Great Britain and Ireland took effect on 1 January 1801, replacing the Drogheda constituency in the Parliament of Ireland.

1818 United Kingdom general election

The 1818 United Kingdom general election saw the Whigs gain a few seats, but the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool retained a majority of around 90 seats. The Whigs were divided over their response to growing social unrest and the introduction of the Corn Laws.

At the 1832 general election he was elected as one of the two MPs for County Carlow, and held the seat until he retired from the Commons at the 1835 general election. [8]

1832 United Kingdom general election

The 1832 United Kingdom general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote.

Carlow County (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Carlow County was a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which from 1801 to 1885 returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and one MP from 1885 to 1922.

1835 United Kingdom general election

The 1835 United Kingdom general election was called when Parliament was dissolved on 29 December 1834. Polling took place between 6 January and 6 February 1835, and the results saw Robert Peel's Conservatives make large gains from their low of the 1832 election, but the Whigs maintained a large majority.

Wallace died at the age of 81.

Related Research Articles

Henry Grattan (junior) Irish politician (1789–1859)

Henry Grattan was an Irish politician, who was Member of Parliament for Dublin City on behalf of the Whigs from 1826 to 1830 in the British House of Commons. From 1831 to 1852, he represented Meath for the Repeal Association.

County Louth, otherwise known as Louth County or Louth, is a former parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which was represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. From 1801 to 1885 it returned two Members of Parliament (MPs), and one in 1918–1922.

South Sligo was a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 to 1922.

South Louth was a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 to 1918. Prior to the 1885 general election and after the dissolution of Parliament in 1918 the area was part of the Louth constituency.

Thomas Gisborne was an English Whig and Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1830 and 1852.

John Stuart-Wortley, 2nd Baron Wharncliffe British Tory politician

John Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie, 2nd Baron Wharncliffe FRS, was a British Tory politician. He served briefly as Under-Secretary of State for War and the Colonies between December 1834 and January 1835.

Patrick Leopold Martin, was an Irish politician in the United Kingdom House of Commons.

Henry Bruen PC, DL was an Irish Conservative Party politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Carlow County from 1857 to 1880, taking his seat in the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. He was the third in a line of Henry Bruens to represent County Carlow.

Colonel Henry Bruen was an Irish Tory Party politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Carlow County for a total of about 36 years, in three separate periods between 1812 and 1852, taking his seat in the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Francis Bruen was an Irish Conservative Party politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Carlow Borough from 1835 to 1837, and briefly in 1839, taking his seat in the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Sir John Joseph Mooney was an Irish nationalist politician. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1900 to 1918, taking his seat as an Irish Parliamentary Party member of the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. He was a member of a prominent Dublin business and pub-owning family, J G Mooney & Co plc.

William McCullagh Torrens Anglo-Irish Liberal politician

William Torrens McCullagh Torrens was an Irish Liberal politician, who sat in the House of Commons for English constituencies variously between 1848 and 1885.

Richard Bethell was a British Tory and then Conservative Party politician from Rise in the East Riding of Yorkshire. He sat in the House of Commons between 1830 and 1841.

John Charles Ramsden was a British Whig and Liberal Party politician from Newby Park in Yorkshire. He sat in the House of Commons between 1812 and 1836.

William Elliot was an Irish politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons before its abolition. After the Act of Union he sat as a Whig in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

John Nicholas Fazakerley was a British Whig politician. He was Member of Parliament for Lincoln (1812–18), Great Grimsby (1818–20), Tavistock (1820), Lincoln again (1826-30) and City of Peterborough (1830–41).

Lieutenant Colonel Charles George Tottenham from County Wexford was an Irish officer in the British Army and a Conservative politician.

Walter Bagenal was an Irish politician who sat in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1802 to 1812.

Nicholas Philpot Leader was an Irish barrister, landowner, businessman and Liberal politician. He sat in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1830 to 1832.

References

  1. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "D" (part 3)
  2. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "C" (part 2)
  3. 1 2 3 4 Brian M. Walker, ed. (1978). Parliamentary election results in Ireland 1801–1922. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. pp. 209–210. ISBN   0-901714-12-7.
  4. R. G. Thorne The House of Commons, 1790-1820, Volume 1 p 674
  5. 1 2 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 522. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
  6. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "Y"
  7. Walker, page50
  8. Walker, page 256
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Lord Binning
Joseph Phillimore
Member of Parliament for Yarmouth (Isle of Wight)
1827 – 1830
With: Joseph Phillimore
Succeeded by
William Yates Peel
George Lowther Thompson
Preceded by
John Henry North
Member of Parliament for Drogheda
18311832
Succeeded by
Andrew Carew O'Dwyer
Preceded by
Sir John Milley Doyle
Walter Blackney
Member of Parliament for County Carlow
18321835
With: Walter Blackney
Succeeded by
Thomas Kavanagh
Henry Bruen