Thomas Walsingham (MP)

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Sir Thomas Walsingham (c. 1589 - April 1669) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1640. He supported the Parliamentarian side in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Contents

Life

Walsingham was the son of Sir Thomas Walsingham and his wife Katherine Gunter, daughter of John Gunter of Chilworth, Surrey, and Brecknock in Wales. He was knighted at Royston on 26 November 1613. [1] In 1614 he was elected Member of Parliament for Poole. He was elected MP for Rochester in 1621 and again in 1628 and held the seat until 1629 when King Charles I decided to rule without parliament for eleven years. [2] He was made vice-admiral of Kent in 1627.

Sir Thomas Walsingham was a courtier to Queen Elizabeth I and literary patron to such poets as Thomas Watson, Thomas Nashe, George Chapman and Christopher Marlowe. He was related to Elizabeth's spymaster Francis Walsingham and the employer of Marlowe's murderer Ingram Frizer. This connection is one of the reasons offered for suggesting that Marlowe's death may have been linked with intelligence work, and not a dispute over a bill for food and accommodation, as in the coroner's verdict.

Chilworth, Surrey village in United Kingdom

Chilworth is a village in the Guildford borough of Surrey, England, southeast of Guildford. Chilworth has three churches, two pre-secondary education schools, an independent pub-restaurant and a railway station. The village occupies both sides of the Tillingbourne between outcrops of the Greensand Ridge including St Martha's Hill. Footpaths lead through fields and woodlands along the ranges of hills. Chilworth is split between two civil parishes, Shalford CP to the west and St Martha's CP to the east. It also has a recreation ground with a park that has a sports pavilion used for football, and an all weather table tennis table.

Royston, Hertfordshire town in Hertfordshire, England

Royston is a town and civil parish in the District of North Hertfordshire and county of Hertfordshire in England.

In April 1640, Walsingham was re-elected MP for Rochester for the Short Parliament and again in November 1640 for the Long Parliament when he sat until 1653, surviving Pride's Purge. [2] He sold the family property of Scadbury in around 1655.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Prides Purge Event in second English Civil War

Pride's Purge was an event that took place in December 1648, during the Second English Civil War, when troops of the New Model Army under the command of Colonel Thomas Pride forcibly removed from the Long Parliament all those who were not supporters of the Grandees in the New Model Army and the Independents. Some have called it a coup d'état.

Walsingham died in 1669 and was buried at Chislehurst on 10 April 1669.

Chislehurst district in South East London, England

Chislehurst is a suburban district in south east London, England, within the London Borough of Bromley. It borders the London Boroughs of Bexley and Greenwich, and lies east of Bromley and south west of Sidcup. It is 10.5 miles (16.9 km) south east of Charing Cross.

Family

Walsingham married twice, his first wife being Elizabeth Manwood, daughter of Sir Peter Manwood.

Sir Peter Manwood (1571–1625) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1589 and 1621.

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References

  1. Knights of England
  2. 1 2 Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 229–239.

Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : "Walsingham, Edmund". Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

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<i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> multi-volume reference work

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Robarts
Edward Man
Member of Parliament for Poole
1614
With: Sir Walter Erle
Succeeded by
George Horsey
Sir Walter Erle
Preceded by
Sir Edwin Sandys
Sir Edward Hoby
Member of Parliament for Rochester
1620–1629
With: Henry Clerke 1620-1624
Maximilian Dallison 1624
Henry Clerke 1625-1629
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended to 1640
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Rochester
1640–1653
With: John Clerke 1640
Richard Lee 1640–1648
Succeeded by
Rochester not represented in Barebones Parliament