Thomas Walter Swan

Last updated
Thomas Walter Swan
Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
July 1, 1953 July 13, 1975
Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
1951–1953
Preceded by Learned Hand
Succeeded by Harrie B. Chase
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
December 22, 1926 July 1, 1953
Appointed by Calvin Coolidge
Preceded by Henry Wade Rogers
Succeeded by Carroll C. Hincks
Personal details
Born
Thomas Walter Swan

(1877-12-20)December 20, 1877
Norwich, Connecticut
DiedJuly 13, 1975(1975-07-13) (aged 97)
Education Yale University (A.B.)
Harvard Law School (LL.B.)

Thomas Walter Swan (December 20, 1877 – July 13, 1975) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

United States federal judge position in the USA

In the United States, the title of federal judge means a judge appointed by the president of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate pursuant to the Appointments Clause in Article II of the United States Constitution.

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is one of the thirteen United States Courts of Appeals. Its territory comprises the states of Connecticut, New York, and Vermont, and the court has appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:

Contents

Education and career

Born in Norwich, Connecticut Swan received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from Yale University in 1900. He received a Bachelor of Laws from Harvard Law School in 1903. He was in private practice of law in Chicago, Illinois from 1903 to 1916. He was a lecturer in law at the University of Chicago from 1903 to 1904, and in 1908. He was Dean and Professor of Law at Yale Law School from 1916 to 1927. [1]

Norwich, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwich, known as 'The Rose of New England,' is a city in New London County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 40,493 at the 2010 United States Census. Three rivers, the Yantic, the Shetucket, and the Quinebaug, flow into the city and form its harbor, from which the Thames River flows south to Long Island Sound.

Connecticut U.S. state in the United States

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Federal judicial service

Swan was nominated by President Calvin Coolidge on December 15, 1926, to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit vacated by Judge Henry Wade Rogers. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 22, 1926, and received his commission the same day. He served as Chief Judge and as a member of the Judicial Conference of the United States from 1951 to 1953. He assumed senior status on July 1, 1953. His service was terminated on July 13, 1975, due to his death. [1]

Calvin Coolidge 30th president of the United States

Calvin Coolidge was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 30th president of the United States from 1923 to 1929. A Republican lawyer from New England, born in Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor. His response to the Boston Police Strike of 1919 thrust him into the national spotlight and gave him a reputation as a man of decisive action. The next year, he was elected vice president of the United States, and he succeeded to the presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small government conservative and also as a man who said very little and had a rather dry sense of humor.

Henry Wade Rogers American judge

Henry Wade Rogers was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

Notable decisions as sitting judge

<i>Nichols v. Universal Pictures Corp.</i>

Nichols v. Universal Pictures Corporation, 45 F.2d 119, was a United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit case on copyright infringement by non-literal copying of a dramatic work. The Court held that copyright protection cannot be extended to the characteristics of stock characters in a story, whether it be a book, play, or film.

<i>United States v. One Package of Japanese Pessaries</i>

United States v. One Package of Japanese Pessaries, 86 F.2d 737, was an in rem United States Court of Appeals case in the Second Circuit involving birth control.

<i>United States v. Peoni</i>

United States v. Peoni, 100 F.2d 401, was a criminal case that the prosecution must establish that the mental state of an accomplice to a crime include a purpose to aid or encourage, and thereby facilitate the criminal conduct of the principal. This showing of purpose is contrasted with showing knowledge that the principal would commit the crime, which does not necessarily imply that the purpose of acting to aid or abet was to facilitate the criminal act of the principal.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Swan, Thomas Walter - Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.

Sources

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

The Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.

Academic offices
Preceded by
Henry Wade Rogers
Dean of Yale Law School
1916–1927
Succeeded by
Robert Maynard Hutchins
Legal offices
Preceded by
Henry Wade Rogers
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1926–1953
Succeeded by
Carroll C. Hincks
Preceded by
Learned Hand
Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1951–1953
Succeeded by
Harrie B. Chase