Thomas Walton

Last updated

Sir Thomas Walton (or Wauton or Waweton) (c. 1370 – c. 1450) was an English MP and Speaker of the House of Commons.

Speaker of the House of Commons (United Kingdom) presiding officer of the United Kingdoms lower chamber of Parliament

The Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, the United Kingdom's lower chamber of Parliament. The office is currently held by John Bercow, who was initially elected on 22 June 2009, following the resignation of Michael Martin. He has since been re-elected (unopposed) three times, following the general elections in 2010, 2015 and 2017.

He was born the son of John de Walton of Great Staughton, Huntingdonshire, who was a previous MP for Huntingdonshire.

Great Staughton village in the United Kingdom

Great Staughton is a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. Great Staughton lies approximately 8 miles (13 km) south-west of Huntingdon. Great Staughton is situated within Huntingdonshire which is a non-metropolitan district of Cambridgeshire as well as being a historic county of England.

Huntingdonshire County of England

Huntingdonshire is a non-metropolitan district of Cambridgeshire, as well as a historic county of England. Its council is based in Huntingdon. Other towns in the district are St Ives, Godmanchester, St Neots and Ramsey. The population was 169,508 at the 2011 Census. Henry II, on his accession in 1154, declared all of Huntingdonshire a royal forest, but its favourable arable soil, with loam, light clay and gravel, hence good drainage, meant it was largely farmland by the 18th century.

Huntingdonshire was a Parliamentary constituency covering the county of Huntingdonshire in England. It was represented in the House of Commons of England until 1707, then in the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and then in the House of Commons the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It returned two Knights of the Shire ; when elections were contested, the bloc vote system was used.

Thomas first entered Parliament as MP for Huntingdonshire in January 1396 and was then re-elected in September 1396, October 1400, and September 1402. He may have sat for Bedfordshire in 1409 and 1411 (the returns for those years have been lost) but on 8 May 1413 he was recorded as MP for the county. On 3 Nov 1414 he was returned once again for his home constituency of Huntingdonshire.[ citation needed ]

Bedfordshire was a United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency, which elected two Members of Parliament from 1295 until 1885, when it was divided into two constituencies under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

He was appointed High Sheriff of Bedfordshire for 1415, and knighted in September 1418. On 18 Sep 1419 he was again elected to parliament for Bedfordshire and on 23 Nov 1420 and 24 Oct 1422 again elected for Huntingdonshire. In 1422 he served a second term as sheriff of Bedfordshire and was appointed chamberlain of North Wales. On 20 Mar 1424 he was once more elected for Bedfordshire and this time was elected Speaker of the House. He served a third and fourth term as sheriff of Bedfordshire in 1428 and 1432, serving in between in 1431 as Knight of the Shire for Bedfordshire for the last time. In 1448 he was pardoned from any obligations to hold future office and died soon afterwards.

This is a list of High Sheriffs of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire. One sheriff was appointed for both counties from 1125 until the end of 1575, after which separate sheriffs were appointed. See High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire for dates before 1125 or after 1575.

The Chamberlain of North Wales was a financial official of the Principality of Wales during the medieval period. He controlled the provincial Exchequer located at Caernarfon.

He had married Alana Berry of Wales with whom he had two sons and two daughters.

Related Research Articles

Sir Thomas Tresham was a British politician, soldier and administrator. He was the son of Sir William Tresham and his wife Isabel de Vaux, daughter of Sir William Vaux of Harrowden. Thomas's early advancement was due to his father's influence. In 1443 he and his father were appointed as stewards to the Duchy of Lancaster's estates in Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Bedfordshire and Huntingdonshire, and by 1446 Thomas was serving as an esquire for Henry VI, being made an usher of the king's chamber in 1455. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace for Huntingdonshire in 1446, a position he held until 1459, and was returned to Parliament for Buckinghamshire in 1447 and Huntingdonshire in 1449. Despite the Tresham family's close links with the royal court they were also on good terms with Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and when he returned from Ireland in 1450 Tresham and his father went to greet him. Shortly after leaving home on 23 September they were attacked by a group of men involved in a property dispute with his father; William Tresham was killed, and Thomas was injured.

Sir John Say was an English courtier, MP and Speaker of the House of Commons.

Sir Richard Waldegrave was a Member of Parliament for Suffolk and Speaker of the House of Commons during the reign of King Richard II.

John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock English politician and Baron

John Wenlock, 1st Baron Wenlock KG was an English diplomat, soldier, courtier and politician. He fought on the sides of both the Yorkists and the Lancastrians in the Wars of the Roses. He has been called "the prince of turncoats", although some historians suggest the label may not be fair. Others contend that even when Wenlock was not actually changing sides, he was engaged in "fence sitting par excellence."

Robert Sawyer (Attorney General) English politician

Sir Robert Sawyer, of Highclere (1633–1692) was the Attorney General for England and Wales (1681–1687) and, briefly, Speaker of the English House of Commons.

Thomas Wentworth was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1604 and 1626. He was a vocal if imprudent defender of the rights of the House of Commons.

Edward Phelips (speaker) English lawyer and politician (1550s–1614)

Sir Edward Phelips was an English lawyer and politician, the Speaker of the English House of Commons from 1604 until 1611, and subsequently Master of the Rolls from 1611 until his death in 1614. He was an elected MP from 1584, and in 1588, following a successful career as a lawyer, he commissioned Montacute House to be built as a Summer house for himself and his family. He was knighted in 1603 and one of his major roles was as the opening prosecutor during the trial of the Gunpowder Plotters.

Sir Henry Redford or Retford was a Knight of the Shire, Sheriff of Lincolnshire and the Speaker of the House of Commons.

Sir Richard Redman was a British soldier, administrator and politician, being elected as a Member of Parliament representing Yorkshire and later acting as the Speaker of the House of Commons for the Parliament of 1415.

Roger Flower or Flore was an English politician, 12 times MP for Rutland and four times Speaker of the House of Commons.

Roger Hunt was an English MP and Speaker of the House of Commons.

William Burley was MP for Shropshire nineteen times and Speaker of the House of Commons of England.

Thomas Charlton (1417?–1465) was a speaker for House of Commons of England in 1454.

John Popham (military commander) English politician and army commander

Sir John Popham was MP for Hampshire and Sheriff of Hampshire. He was a military commander and speaker-elect of the House of Commons. He took part in Henry V's invasion of France in 1415 and in the French wars under John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford. He was elected Speaker of the House of Commons in 1449 but was permitted by King Henry VI to decline the office on the ground of infirmity.

Sir Francis Barnham (1576–1646) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1604 and 1646. He supported the Parliamentary cause in the English Civil War.

Sir Thomas Puckering, 1st Baronet was an English landowner, courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1621 and 1629.

Sir Robert Brerewood was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640.

Sir Thomas Walsingham was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1640. He supported the Parliamentarian side in the English Civil War.

Sir Robert Berkeley was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1624. He suffered considerably for giving a judgement in favour of Ship Money.

Sir John Ferrers (1566–1633) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1586 and 1611.

References

    <i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> multi-volume reference work

    The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.

    Attribution

    Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : "Walton, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

    Political offices
    Preceded by
    Edmund Hampden
    High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    1414–1415
    Succeeded by
    Richard Wyot
    Preceded by
    William Massey
    High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    1422–1423
    Succeeded by
    Sir John Cheyne
    Preceded by
    Humphrey Stafford
    High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    1428–1430
    Succeeded by
    Thomas Hoo
    Preceded by
    Sir Giles Daubeney
    High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    1432–1433
    Succeeded by
    James Gascoigne
    Preceded by
    John Russell
    Speaker of the House of Commons
    1424–1426
    Succeeded by
    Richard Vernon