Thomas Warrington, 1st Baron Warrington of Clyffe

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Lord Warrington of Clyffe.

Thomas Rolls Warrington, 1st Baron Warrington of Clyffe, PC, QC (29 May 1851 – 26 October 1937), known as Sir Thomas Warrington between 1904 and 1926, was a British lawyer and judge.

Queens Counsel jurist appointed by letters patent

A Queen's Counsel, or King's Counsel during the reign of a king, is an eminent lawyer who is appointed by the monarch to be one of "Her Majesty's Counsel learned in the law." The term is recognised as an honorific. The position exists in some Commonwealth jurisdictions around the world, but other Commonwealth countries have either abolished the position, or re-named it to eliminate monarchical connotations, such as "Senior Counsel" or "Senior Advocate". Queen's Counsel is an office, conferred by the Crown, that is recognised by courts. Members have the privilege of sitting within the bar of court.

Warrington was called to the Bar, Lincoln's Inn, in 1875, and after acquiring a large practice, became a Queen's Counsel in 1895. [1] In 1904 he was appointed a judge of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice and knighted. [2] In 1915 he became a Lord Justice of Appeal and sworn of the Privy Council, [3] which entitled him to sit on the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. On his retirement in 1926 he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Warrington of Clyffe, of Market Lavington in the County of Wiltshire. [4] He continued to sit on the Judicial Committee after his retirement.

Lincolns Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

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Lord Warrington of Clyffe died in October 1937, aged 86, when the barony became extinct.

Judgements

<i>Barron v Potter</i>

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References

  1. "No. 26590". The London Gazette . 18 January 1895. p. 342.
  2. "No. 27715". The London Gazette . 20 September 1904. p. 6043.
  3. "No. 29149". The London Gazette . 30 April 1915. p. 4169.
  4. "No. 33216". The London Gazette . 29 October 1926. p. 6884.
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Warrington of Clyffe
1926 – 1937
Extinct