Thomas Watson, 3rd Earl of Rockingham

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Arms of Watson, of Rockingham Castle: Argent, on a chevron engrailed azure between three martlets sable as many crescents or WatsonRockinghamArms.svg
Arms of Watson, of Rockingham Castle: Argent, on a chevron engrailed azure between three martlets sable as many crescents or

Thomas Watson, 3rd Earl of Rockingham (30 December 1715 – 26 February 1746), styled Hon. Thomas Watson until 1745, was an English nobleman and politician. He represented Canterbury in the House of Commons and was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Kent after succeeding to the earldom, but died shortly thereafter.

Canterbury (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Canterbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Rosie Duffield of the Labour Party.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord-Lieutenant of Kent. Since 1746, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Kent.

The second son of Edward Watson, Viscount Sondes, Watson entered Eton College in 1725 and Lincoln's Inn in 1732. In the 1741 British general election, he stood for Canterbury as an opposition Whig. Watson and the Tory Thomas Best ousted the incumbent Sir Thomas Hales, a Whig supporter of Walpole's administration. He continued in opposition to successive governments during his tenure in the House of Commons, which terminated in 1745 when he became Earl of Rockingham on the death of his elder brother Lewis. Despite his politics, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Kent in succession to his brother, but did not long survive the appointment, dying on 26 February 1746. [1]

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Rockingham never married, and upon his death, the titles of Earl of Rockingham, Viscount Sondes, and Baron Throwley became extinct. He was succeeded as Baron Rockingham by Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Earl of Malton, his first cousin once removed. Rockingham left his estate to his first cousin Lewis Monson, who thereafter adopted the surname of Watson. [1]

Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham British politician

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Lewis Watson, 1st Baron Sondes, called Hon. Lewis Monson before 1746 and Hon. Lewis Watson from 1746 to 1760, was a British Whig politician and peer.

Titles from birth to death

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Earl Sondes, of Lees Court in the County of Kent, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1880 for the former Conservative Member of Parliament for East Kent, George Milles, 5th Baron Sondes. He was made Viscount Throwley, of the County of Kent, at the same time, which title was used as a courtesy title by the eldest son and heir apparent of the Earl. The titles became extinct on the death of his great-grandson, the fifth Earl, in 1996.

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References

  1. 1 2 Newman, A. N. (1970). "WATSON, Hon. Thomas (1715-46).". In Sedgwick, Romney (ed.). The House of Commons 1715-1754. The History of Parliament Trust.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas May
Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
Member of Parliament for Canterbury
1741–1745
With: Thomas Best
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
Thomas Best
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Rockingham
Lord Lieutenant of Kent
1746
Succeeded by
The Duke of Dorset
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Lewis Watson
Earl of Rockingham
1745–1746
Extinct
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Lewis Watson
Baron Rockingham
1745–1746
Succeeded by
Thomas Watson-Wentworth