Thomas Watts Eden

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Thomas Watts Eden FRCOG (8 May 1863 – 22 September 1946) [1] was consulting obstetric physician to Charing Cross Hospital and consulting surgeon to both Queen Charlotte's Hospital and the Chelsea Hospital for Women. During the First World War he served as a major with the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was a founding fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. [2]

Charing Cross Hospital Hospital in London

Charing Cross Hospital is an acute general teaching hospital located in Fulham, London, United Kingdom. The present hospital was opened in 1973, although it was originally established in 1818, approximately five miles east, in central London.

Royal Army Medical Corps military unit

The Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) is a specialist corps in the British Army which provides medical services to all Army personnel and their families, in war and in peace. The RAMC, the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, the Royal Army Dental Corps and Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps form the Army Medical Services.

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) is professional association based in London, United Kingdom. Its members, including people with and without medical degrees, work in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G), that is, pregnancy, childbirth, and female sexual and reproductive health. The College has over 16,000 members in over 100 countries with nearly 50% of those residing outside the British Isles.

He was President of the Royal Society of Medicine for 1931–33.

A fellowship in his name is awarded by the Royal College of Physicians. [3]

Royal College of Physicians professional body of doctors of general medicine and its subspecialties in the UK

The Royal College of Physicians is a British professional body dedicated to improving the practice of medicine, chiefly through the accreditation of physicians by examination. Founded in 1518, it set the first international standard in the classification of diseases, and its library contains medical texts of great historical interest.

Selected publications

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References

  1. Thomas Watts Eden. Munk's Roll, Royal College of Physicians. Retrieved 25 February 2018.
  2. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). (2014) RCOG Roll of Active Service, 1914-1918. London: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. p. 5. Archived here.
  3. Thomas Watts Eden paediatric fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians. Royal College of Physicians. Retrieved 25 February 2018.