Thomas Wells (Royal Navy officer)

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Thomas Wells
Born1759
Died31 October 1811
Allegiance Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Melampus
HMS Defence
HMS Glory
Nore Command
Battles/wars French Revolutionary Wars

Vice Admiral Thomas Wells (1759 – 31 October 1811) was a Royal Navy officer who became Commander-in-Chief, The Nore.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

Commander-in-Chief, The Nore former operational commander of the Royal Navy

The Commander-in-Chief, The Nore was an operational commander of the Royal Navy. His subordinate units, establishments, and staff were sometimes informally known as the Nore Station or Nore Command.

Contents

Wells joined the Royal Navy in 1774. He became commanding officer of the frigate HMS Melampus in early 1794 during the French Revolutionary Wars. [1] During this time Melampus participated in the Action of 23 April 1794, during which the British took three vessels, Engageante, Pomone, and Babet. [2] Melampus had five men killed and five wounded. [3] He went on to be commanding officer of the third-rate HMS Defence later in 1794 and commanding officer of the second-rate HMS Glory in 1799. [1] He acted as a pallbearer at the funeral of Lord Nelson in October 1805. [1] After that he became Commander-in-Chief, The Nore in 1807 [4] and was promoted to Vice Admiral of the Red in 1808. [1]

Frigate Type of warship

A frigate is a type of warship, having various sizes and roles over the last few centuries.

HMS <i>Melampus</i> (1785)

HMS Melampus was a Royal Navy fifth-rate frigate that served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. She captured numerous prizes before the British sold her to the Royal Netherlands Navy in 1815. With the Dutch, she participated in a major action at Algiers and, then, in a number of colonial punitive expeditions in the Dutch East Indies.

French Revolutionary Wars series of conflicts fought between the French Republic and several European monarchies from 1792 to 1802

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution. They pitted France against Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia and several other monarchies. They are divided in two periods: the War of the First Coalition (1792–97) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). Initially confined to Europe, the fighting gradually assumed a global dimension. After a decade of constant warfare and aggressive diplomacy, France had conquered a wide array of territories, from the Italian Peninsula and the Low Countries in Europe to the Louisiana Territory in North America. French success in these conflicts ensured the spread of revolutionary principles over much of Europe.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Admiral Wells: History" . Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  2. "No. 13646". The London Gazette . 28 April 1794. pp. 377–379.
  3. "No. 13651". The London Gazette . 5 May 1794. p. 402.
  4. Winfield, p. 17

Sources

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

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Military offices
Preceded by
Lord Keith
Commander-in-Chief, The Nore
18071810
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Stanhope