Thomas Wendy

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Doctor Thomas Wendy (May 1499/1500 [1] – 11 May 1560) [1] [2] was the royal physician to Henry VIII of England, a Member of Parliament and a member of the King's Privy Chamber.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Wendy attended the king on his deathbed and was one of the witnesses to his last will and testament. [1] [3] Wendy is credited by John Foxe as being the informer to Queen Catherine Parr of the intentions of Thomas Wriothesley and Bishop Stephen Gardiner who would try to arrest the queen for heresy. [4] Wendy had been appointed as physician to Henry's sixth wife, Catherine Parr, before October 1546. [4] Wendy is believed to have had Protestant sympathies. [4]

Catherine Parr Queen Consort of Henry VIII

Catherine Parr was Queen of England and Ireland (1543–47) as the last of the six wives of King Henry VIII, and the final queen consort of the House of Tudor. She married him on 12 July 1543, and outlived him by one year. With four husbands she is the most-married English queen.

Wendy also served as royal physician to Henry's successors, Edward VI and Mary I. [1] He was appointed an ecclesiastical visitor by Elizabeth I in 1556. He served alongside George Owen and Edmund Harman.

Edward VI of England 16th-century Tudor King of England

Edward VI was King of England and Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. He was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine. Edward was the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, and England's first monarch to be raised as a Protestant. During his reign, the realm was governed by a regency council because he never reached his majority. The council was first led by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (1547–1549), and then by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick (1550–1553), who from 1551 was Duke of Northumberland.

Mary I of England Queen of England and Ireland

Mary I, also known as Mary Tudor, was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. She is best known for her aggressive attempt to reverse the English Reformation, which had begun during the reign of her father, Henry VIII. The executions that marked her pursuit of the restoration of Roman Catholicism in England and Ireland led to her denunciation as "Bloody Mary" by her Protestant opponents.

Elizabeth I of England Queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until 1603

Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.

Dr. Wendy was educated at Cambridge University. [1] He went on to study medicine further abroad. He graduated from Ferrara.

He was a Member of the Parliament of England for St Albans in April 1554 and for Cambridgeshire in 1555. [5]

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it merged with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Cambridgeshire is a former Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885.

Wendy died at Haslingfield, a manor granted to him by Henry VIII, on 11 May 1560. [1]

Haslingfield village in the United Kingdom

Haslingfield is a village and civil parish in South Cambridgeshire, England. The village is about six miles south-west of Cambridge, between Harston, Barton and Barrington. The population in the 2001 census was 1,550 people living in 621 households, reducing at the 2011 Census to a population of 1,507 living in 626 households. The main streets in the village are called High Street and New Road which together form an approximate circle around the Manor House. To find out more about what is going on in Haslingfield today see here

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Wikisource-logo.svg  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Wendy, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography . 60. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  2. J.G. Nichols (editor) (1848). "Notes to the diary: 1560". The Diary of Henry Machyn: Citizen and Merchant-Taylor of London (1550–1563). Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 22 August 2013.
  3. http://www.wood-ditton.org.uk/history.htm
  4. 1 2 3 Stanley Bindoff. The House of Commons: 1509–1558, Boydell & Brewer, 1982. pg 580-81.
  5. http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/wendy-thomas-149899-1560