Thomas Wendy (MP)

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Sir Thomas Wendy (8 February 1614 – 17 November 1673) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Wendy was the son of Francis Wendy. In 1629 he inherited the Haslingfield estate of his uncle Sir WIlliam Wendy. [1] He was High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire in 1638.

Haslingfield village in the United Kingdom

Haslingfield is a village and civil parish in South Cambridgeshire, England. The village is about six miles south-west of Cambridge, between Harston, Barton and Barrington. The population in the 2001 census was 1,550 people living in 621 households, reducing at the 2011 Census to a population of 1,507 living in 626 households. The main streets in the village are called High Street and New Road which together form an approximate circle around the Manor House. To find out more about what is going on in Haslingfield today see here

In 1660, Wendy was elected Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire in the Convention Parliament. [2] He was knighted in 1661. [3] He was re-elected MP for Cambridgeshire in 1661 for the Cavalier Parliament and sat until his death.

Cambridgeshire is a former Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885.

Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year. Elected as a "free parliament", i.e. with no oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth or to the monarchy, it was predominantly Royalist in its membership. It assembled for the first time on 25 April 1660.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Wendy made a collection of medals, optic glasses, and other rare items at Haslingfield Hall and also a considerable library. He brought a Danish savant called Simon Ertman back from his travels, who helped to found the parish school. [1]

Wendy died childless, at the age of 59. He settled most of his estates, including Haslingfield, on his nephew Thomas Stewart, son of his sister Susan and Thomas Stewart of Barton Mills. His executors gave his library to Balliol College, Oxford. [1]

Balliol College, Oxford constituent college of the University of Oxford

Balliol College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. One of Oxford's oldest colleges, it was founded around 1263 by John I de Balliol, a rich landowner from Barnard Castle in County Durham, who provided the foundation and endowment for the college. When de Balliol died in 1269 his widow, Dervorguilla, a woman whose wealth far exceeded that of her husband, continued his work in setting up the college, providing a further endowment, and writing the statutes. She is considered a co‑founder of the college.

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Francis Russell
Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire
1660–1674
With: Isaac Thornton 1660
Thomas Chicheley 1661–1674
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Hatton, 2nd Baronet
Thomas Chicheley