Thomas Wenman, 2nd Viscount Wenman

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Thomas Wenman, 2nd Viscount Wenman (1596 – 25 January 1665), was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1621 and 1660.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Wenman was the only son of Richard Wenman, 1st Viscount Wenman, by Agnes, eldest surviving daughter of Sir George Fermor, of Easton Neston, Northamptonshire. He took part in the settlement of Ireland and was granted lands in Garrycastle in the King's County. [1] He also sat as Member of Parliament for Brackley from 1621 to 1622 and 1624 to 1625 and for Oxfordshire in 1626, from November 1640 to 1648 and in 1660. [2] He was appointed by the Long Parliament to be one of the commissioners to carry the propositions for peace to Charles at Oxford in 1643 and was also a commissioner for the Treaty of Uxbridge in 1645 and the Treaty of Newport in 1648. In 1645 he was granted £4 a week by Parliament for damages caused by the King's forces at his Oxfordshire estate. [1]

Richard Wenman, 1st Viscount Wenman (1573–1640) was an English soldier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1625. He was created Viscount Wenman in the Peerage of Ireland in 1628.

Easton Neston civil parish in South Northamptonshire, Northamptonshire, England

Easton Neston is situated in South Northamptonshire, England. Though the village of Easton Neston which was inhabited until around 1500 is now gone, the parish retains the name. At the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish remained less than 100 and was included in the town of Towcester.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

Lord Wenman married Margaret, daughter of Edmund Hampden. He died without surviving male issue in January 1665 [2] and was succeeded by his younger brother, Philip.

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References

Wikisource-logo.svg "Wenman, Thomas (1596-1665)". Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 

<i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> multi-volume reference work

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published since 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.

Parliament of England
Preceded by
William Spencer
Arthur Terringham
Member of Parliament for Brackley
1621–1625
With: Edward Spencer
Succeeded by
Sir John Hobart
John Crew
Preceded by
Sir William Cope
Sir Richard Wenman
Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire
1626
With: Hon. James Fiennes
Succeeded by
Hon. James Fiennes
Sir Francis Wenman
Preceded by
Sir John Hobart
John Crew
Member of Parliament for Brackley
1628–1629
With: John Curzon
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Brackley
1640
With: Sir Martin Lister
Succeeded by
John Crew
Sir Martin Lister
Preceded by
Hon. James Fiennes
Sir Francis Wenman
Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire
1640–1648
With: Hon. James Fiennes
Succeeded by
Not represented in Rump parliament
Preceded by
Not represented in the restored Rump
Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire
1660
With: Hon. James Fiennes
Succeeded by
The Viscount Falkland
Sir Anthony Cope
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Richard Wenman
Viscount Wenman
1640–1668
Succeeded by
Philip Wenman