Thomas Wenman (died 1577)

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Thomas Wenman (c. 1548 — 23 July 1577) was an English country gentleman who briefly sat in the House of Commons of England, representing Buckingham.

Kingdom of England historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Buckingham (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Buckingham /ˈbʌkɪŋm̩/ is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1997 by former Conservative MP John Bercow, who later became Speaker of the House of Commons.

He was the eldest son of Sir Richard Wenman, a Buckinghamshire landowner, by his marriage to Isabel, daughter and coheiress of John Williams, 1st Baron Williams of Thame, who on her father's death in 1559 inherited the manor of Thame. [1]

Landed gentry largely historical British social class, consisting of land owners who could live entirely off rental income

The landed gentry, or simply the gentry, is a largely historical British social class consisting in theory of landowners who could live entirely from rental income, or at least had a country estate. It was distinct from, and socially "below", the aristocracy or peerage, although in fact some of the landed gentry were wealthier than some peers, and many gentry were related to peers. They often worked as administrators of their own lands, while others became public, political, religious, and armed forces figures. The decline of this privileged class largely stemmed from the 1870s agricultural depression; however, there are still a large number of hereditary gentry in the UK to this day, many of whom transferred their landlord style management skills after the agricultural depression into the business of land agency, the act of buying and selling land.

John Williams, 1st Baron Williams of Thame Tudor administrator

John Williams, 1st Baron Williams of Thame was Treasurer of the King's Jewels, Lord Chamberlain of England (1553–1557) and Lord President of the Council of the Welsh Marches. He was summoned to parliament as Lord Williams of Thame on 17 February 1554.

Thame market town and civil parish in South Oxfordshire district, Oxfordshire, England

Thame is a market town and civil parish in Oxfordshire, about 13 miles (21 km) east of the city of Oxford and 10 miles (16 km) southwest of the Buckinghamshire town of Aylesbury. It derives its toponym from the River Thame which flows along the north side of the town. The parish includes the hamlet of Moreton south of the town. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 11,561.

Wenman was briefly one of the members of parliament for Buckingham in the parliament of 1571. On his father's death in 1573 he succeeded to estates in Twyford, Beaconsfield, Amersham, Penn, the Chalfonts, and elsewhere in Buckinghamshire, plus the manor of Eaton, then in Berkshire. [1]

Twyford, Buckinghamshire farm village in the United Kingdom

Twyford is a village and civil parish in the Aylesbury Vale district of Buckinghamshire, England. It is about 2 miles (3 km) west of Steeple Claydon and 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of Bicester in Oxfordshire.

Beaconsfield town in Buckinghamshire, England

Beaconsfield is a market town and civil parish within the South Bucks district in Buckinghamshire centred 23.4 miles (38 km) WNW of Charing Cross, central London and 16.0 miles (26 km) SSE of the county's administrative town, Aylesbury. Three towns are within five miles: Amersham, Gerrards Cross and High Wycombe.

Amersham market town within Chiltern district in Buckinghamshire, England

Amersham is a market town and civil parish within the Chiltern district in Buckinghamshire, England, in the Chiltern Hills, 27 miles (43 km) northwest of central London. It is part of the London commuter belt. Amersham is 15 miles (24 km) from Aylesbury and 8 34 miles (14 km) from High Wycombe.

On 9 June 1572 Wenman married Jane, a daughter of William West, 1st Baron De La Warr, at St Dunstan-in-the-West, in the City of London, [2] and in the next five years they had three sons and a daughter. Wenman died at Twyford on 23 July 1577, perhaps of gaol fever that had broken out at Oxford. He left high debts, some to the Crown, having borrowed at high interest before coming into his inheritance, and some of his land had to be sold, including Eaton, for which Sir John Danvers paid £7,700. [1]

William West, 1st Baron De La Warr of the second creation was the elder son of Sir George West (d.1538), second son of Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr, by his third wife, Eleanor Copley, and Elizabeth Morton, widow of Robert Walden, and daughter of Sir Robert Morton of Lechlade, Gloucestershire. He was nephew and adopted heir of his uncle of the half blood, Thomas West, 9th Baron De La Warr, eldest son of the 8th Baron's second wife, Elizabeth Mortimer.

St Dunstan-in-the-West Church in City of London

The Guild Church of St Dunstan-in-the-West is in Fleet Street in the City of London. It is dedicated to a former Bishop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is of medieval origin, although the present building, with an octagonal nave, was constructed in the 1830s to the designs of John Shaw.

City of London City and county in United Kingdom

The City of London is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London is not a London borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts. It is also a separate county of England, being an enclave surrounded by Greater London. It is the smallest county in the United Kingdom.

When Wenman died, his eldest son and heir, Richard Wenman, was aged only four and the Court of Wards and Liveries made him the ward of Jane Wenman and the Earl of Leicester. Leicester sold his interest in the wardship to James Cressy, who then married Jane Wenman. [1] In 1628 Wenman's heir was created Viscount Wenman.

Richard Wenman, 1st Viscount Wenman (1573–1640) was an English soldier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1625. He was created Viscount Wenman in the Peerage of Ireland in 1628.

Court of Wards and Liveries

The Court of Wards and Liveries was a court established during the reign of Henry VIII in England. Its purpose was to administer a system of feudal dues; but as well as the revenue collection, the court was also responsible for wardship and livery issues.

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester English nobleman and the favourite and close friend of Queen Elizabeth I

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, was an English statesman and the favourite of Elizabeth I from her accession until his death. He was a suitor for the Queen's hand for many years.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 WENMAN, Thomas (c.1548-77), of Twyford, Bucks. at History of Parliament online, from P. W. Hasler, The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603 (Boydell and Brewer, 1982)
  2. The Herald and Genealogist Volume 2 (1865), p. 523

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