Thomas Wentworth

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Thomas Wentworth may refer to:

Suffolk was a county constituency of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1290 until 1832, when it was split into two divisions.

Thomas Wentworth, 1st Baron Wentworth English baron

Thomas Wentworth, 1st Baron Wentworth and de jure6th Baron le Despencer, PC was an English peer and courtier during the Tudor dynasty.

Thomas Wentworth, 2nd Baron Wentworth English baron

Thomas Wentworth, 2nd Baron Wentworth was the eldest son of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Baron Wentworth and Margaret Fortescue. He studied at St John's College, Cambridge.

See also

Thomas Wentworth Higginson Union United States Army officer, Unitarian minister, author, and abolitionist

Thomas Wentworth Higginson was an American Unitarian minister, author, abolitionist, and soldier. He was active in the American Abolitionism movement during the 1840s and 1850s, identifying himself with disunion and militant abolitionism. He was a member of the Secret Six who supported John Brown. During the Civil War, he served as colonel of the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, the first federally authorized black regiment, from 1862–1864. Following the war, Higginson devoted much of the rest of his life to fighting for the rights of freed people, women and other disfranchised peoples.

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Guilford Slingsby (1610–1643) was a politician in the Irish Parliament. He was confidential secretary to, and a close personal friend of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford, the Lord Deputy of Ireland. He fought on the Royalist side during the English Civil War, and died of wounds received in battle.

Wentworth is a surname which may refer to:

Carey or Cary Dillon, 5th Earl of Roscommon (1627–1689) was an Irish nobleman and professional soldier of the seventeenth century. He held several Court offices under King Charles II and his successor King James II. After the Glorious Revolution he went over to the Williamite side, and in consequence was attainted as a traitor by James II's Irish Parliament in 1689, shortly before his death.