Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford

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Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford
KG, JP, PC
Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford by Sir Anthony Van Dyck.jpg
Thomas Wentworth, circa 1639 by van Dyck
Lord Deputy of Ireland
In office
1632–1640

Notes

  1. Empey, Mark (2021). "Power, Prerogative, and the Politics of Sir Thomas Wentworth in Early Stuart England and Ireland". The Historical Journal: 1–22. doi: 10.1017/S0018246X21000509 . ISSN   0018-246X.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 York 1911, p. 978.
  3. "Wentworth, Thomas (WNTT609T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  4. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 48, 117.
  5. Wedgwood 1961, p. 74.
  6. Sharpe 1996, p. [ page needed ].
  7. Asch 2004, p.  146, right column, line 23: "Wentworth was appointed lord deputy on 12 January 1632 ..."
  8. Wedgwood 1961, p. 125.
  9. 1 2 Wedgwood 1961, p. 242.
  10. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 143–4.
  11. York 1911, pp. 978, 979.
  12. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 York 1911, p. 979.
  13. Wedgwood 1961, p. 175.
  14. Kenyon, J.P. The Popish Plot, Phoenix Press reissue (2000), p. 224
  15. Wedgwood 1961, p. 158.
  16. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 226–227.
  17. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 148–58.
  18. Wedgwood 1961, p. 150.
  19. Wedgwood 1961, p. 160.
  20. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 320–1.
  21. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 157–8.
  22. Wedgwood 1966, pp. 74–5.
  23. Wedgwood 1961, p. 391.
  24. 1 2 Wedgwood 1961, p. 226.
  25. Wedgwood 1961, p. 324.
  26. Chalmers, Alexander General Biographical Dictionary Vol. 12 (1813) p.91
  27. "He became earl of Strafford in 1640, taking the title from the name of the hundred in which Wentworth Woodhouse was situated" ( Kearney 1989 , p. xxxiv footnote 1)
  28. "Leicester Square, North Side, and Lisle Street Area: Leicester Estate: Leicester House and Leicester Square North Side (Nos 1–16)" in Survey of London , vols. 33–34 (St Anne Soho, 1966), pp 441–472
  29. Upham 1844, pp. 187–198.
  30. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 353–355.
  31. Wedgwood 1961, p. 367.
  32. Orr 2004.
  33. Wedgwood 1961, p. 377.
  34. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 372–377.
  35. Abbott 1876, "Downfall of Strafford and Laud".
  36. Wedgwood 1961, p. 380.
  37. Trevor-Roper, Hugh (2000), Archbishop Laud 1573–1645 (reissue), Phoenix Press, p. 409
  38. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 York 1911, p. 980.
  39. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 383–389.
  40. 1 2 Wedgwood 1961, p. 389.
  41. Wedgwood 1983, p. 190.
  42. Kenyon 1966, p. 97.
  43. Handler, Nicholas (May 2019). "Rediscovering the Journal Clause: The Lost History of Legislative Constitutional Interpretation". University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. 21: 1251–52.
  44. Wedgwood p.384
  45. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 43, 39, 50, 103, 125–6, 384–5.
  46. Wedgwood 1961, pp. 246–7.
  47. 1 2 3 4 5 Gardiner 1899, p. 283.
  48. Wedgwood 1961, p. 393.
  49. "Some Descendants of the WENTWORTH Family Related to George Washington 1st US President". Washington.ancestryregister.com. Retrieved 14 December 2012.
  50. Burke's Peerage, see page 564–5 of this edition
  51. "Mayor of Oxford". Oxfordhistory.org.uk. 20 November 2012. Retrieved 14 December 2012.

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References

Attribution:

Further reading

Parliament of England
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
1614–1622
With: Sir John Savile 1614
Lord George Calvert 1621–1622
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Pontefract
1624
With: Sir John Jackson
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
1625
With: Thomas Fairfax
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Yorkshire
1628
With: Henry Belasyse
Succeeded by
Honorary titles
Preceded by Custos Rotulorum of the West Riding of Yorkshire
1616–1626
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire
1628–1641
Succeeded by
Preceded by Custos Rotulorum of the West Riding of Yorkshire
1630–1641
Preceded by
Lords Justices
Lord Deputy of Ireland
1633–1640
Succeeded by
The Earl of Leicester
(Lord Lieutenant)
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1640–1641
Peerage of England
New creation Earl of Strafford
1st creation
1640–1641
Vacant
Attainted
Title next held by
William Wentworth
Baron Raby
1640–1641
Viscount Wentworth
1629–1641
Baron Wentworth
1628–1641
Baronetage of England
Preceded by Baronet
of Wentworth Woodhouse
1614–1641
Attainted