Thomas Wentworth (British Army officer)

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Lieutenant-General Thomas Wentworth (c. 1693–1747), of Sunninghill, Berkshire, was a British Army officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1743 to 1747. He served in the War of Jenkins' Ear and the Jacobite rising of 1745.

British Army land warfare branch of the British Armed Forces of the United Kingdom

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2018, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

War of Jenkins Ear conflict between Great Britain and Spain

The War of Jenkins' Ear was a conflict between Britain and Spain lasting from 1739 to 1748, mainly in New Granada and the Caribbean, with major operations largely ended by 1742. Its unusual name, coined by British historian Thomas Carlyle in 1858, refers to an ear severed from Robert Jenkins, a captain of a British merchant ship. There is no evidence that supports the stories that the severed ear was exhibited before the British Parliament.

Jacobite rising of 1745 attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for the exiled House of Stuart

The Jacobite rising of 1745, also known as the Forty-five Rebellion or simply the '45, was an attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for his father, James Francis Edward Stuart. It took place during the War of the Austrian Succession, when the bulk of the British Army was fighting in mainland Europe, and proved to be the last in a series of revolts that began in 1689, with major outbreaks in 1708, 1715 and 1719.

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Early life

Wentworth was the third, but second surviving son of Sir Mathew Wentworth, 3rd Baronet, of Bretton, Yorkshire and his wife Elizabeth Osbaldeston, daughter of William Osbaldeston of Hunmanby, Yorkshire. He was the younger brother of Sir William Wentworth, 4th Baronet. He matriculated at University College, Oxford on 28 January 1710, aged 16. [1] He married Elizabeth Lord, daughter of Robert Lord of London on 3 July 1720. [2]

Sir William Wentworth, 4th Baronet (1686–1763), of Bretton Hall, West Yorkshire, was a British landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1731 to 1741.

University College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford in England

University College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. It has a claim to being the oldest college of the university, having been founded in 1249 by William of Durham.

Career

From 1737 to 1745 Wentworth was Colonel of what would soon become the 24th Regiment of Foot. He became commander of the land troops in the amphibious expedition against Cartagena de Indias following the deaths of the original commander, Lord Cathcart, and his second-in-command, General Spotswood, during the War of Jenkins' Ear. He and his troops arrived there in 1741 in a fleet led by Rear-Admiral Sir Chaloner Ogle to reinforce Vice-admiral Edward Vernon, but the British forces still failed to take the town and the land forces suffered catastrophic losses of nearly ninety percent over the course of two years campaigning, mostly from disease. [2]

South Wales Borderers Former infantry regiment of the British Army

The South Wales Borderers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army in existence for 280 years. It first came into existence, as the 24th Regiment of Foot in 1689. Based at Brecon, the regiment recruited from the border counties of Monmouthshire, Herefordshire and Brecknockshire, but was not called the South Wales Borderers until the Childers Reforms of 1881. The regiment served in a great many conflicts, including the American Revolutionary War, various conflicts in India, the Zulu War, Second Boer War, and World War I and World War II. In 1969 the regiment was amalgamated with the Welch Regiment to form the Royal Regiment of Wales.

Battle of Cartagena de Indias

The Battle of Cartagena de Indias took place during the 1739 to 1748 War of Jenkins' Ear between Spain and Britain. The result of long-standing commercial tensions, the war was primarily fought in the Caribbean; the British tried to capture key Spanish ports in the region, including Porto Bello and Chagres, in Panama, Havana and Cartagena de Indias, in present-day Colombia.

Chaloner Ogle Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Chaloner Ogle KB was a Royal Navy officer and politician. After serving as a junior officer during the Nine Years' War, a ship he was commanding was captured by three French ships off Ostend in July 1706 in an action during the War of the Spanish Succession.

Wentworth was returned as [[Member of Parliament for Whitchurch at a by-election in 1743. He voted with the Administration in 1744, and then served in Flanders. In 1745, he was with George Wade, during the Jacobite rising of 1745. He did not vote on the Hanoverians in 1746. [2]

Whitchurch was a parliamentary borough in the English County of Hampshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1586 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

George Wade British Field Marshal

Field Marshal George Wade was a British Army officer who served in the Nine Years' War, War of the Spanish Succession, Jacobite rising of 1715 and War of the Quadruple Alliance before leading the construction of barracks, bridges and proper roads in Scotland. He went on to be a military commander during the War of the Austrian Succession and Commander-in-Chief of the Forces during the Jacobite rising of 1745.

Death

Wentworth died without issue in November 1747. [2]

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References

  1. Foster, Joseph. "Wasborow-Wesley in Alumni Oxonienses 1500-1714 pp.1577-1600". British History Online. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 4 WENTWORTH, Thomas (?1693-1747), of Sunninghill, Berks. at The History of Parliament Online
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Selwyn
Charles Clarke
Member of Parliament for Whitchurch
1743–1747
With: John Selwyn
Succeeded by
John Selwyn
Charles Wallop
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir John Cope
Colonel of Thomas Wentworth's Regiment of Foot
1732–1737
Succeeded by
John Campbell
Preceded by
Thomas Howard
Colonel of Thomas Wentworth's Regiment of Foot
1737–1745
Succeeded by
Daniel Houghton
Preceded by
The Viscount Cobham
Colonel of Thomas Wentworth's Regiment of Horse
1745–1747
Succeeded by
Thomas Bligh