Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr

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Thomas West
8th Baron De La Warr
Coat of arms of Sir Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr, KG.png
Quartered arms of Sir Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr, KG: 1st & 4th: Argent, a fess dancettée sable (West); 2nd & 3rd: Gules crusilly and a lion rampant argent (La Warr) [1]
Bornc. 1457
Died11 October 1525 (aged 6768)
Offington
Buried St. Mary's Church, Broadwater, Sussex
Noble family West
Spouse(s) Eleanor Percy
Elizabeth Mortimer dau. of Hugh.
Eleanor Copley
Issue
with Elizabeth Mortimer:
Thomas West, 9th Baron De La Warr
William West
Anthony West
Richard West
John West
Anne, Baroness Clinton
Eleanor, Lady Guildford
Dorothy, Lady Owen
Margaret West
Elizabeth, Countess of Worcester
Joan West
with Eleanor Copley:
Sir Owen West
Sir George West
Leonard West
Anne, Baroness St Amand
Mary West
Katherine West
Barbara, Lady Guildford
Father Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr
MotherKatherine Hungerford
Arms of West: Argent, a fess dancettee sable. As borne today by Sackville (formerly Sackville-West), Earl De La Warr, Viscount Cantelupe, etc., heirs of Cantilupe West arms.svg
Arms of West: Argent, a fess dancettée sable. As borne today by Sackville (formerly Sackville-West), Earl De La Warr, Viscount Cantelupe, etc., heirs of Cantilupe

Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr and 5th Baron West, KB, KG (c.1457 – 11 October 1525) was an English courtier and military commander during the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII.

Henry VII of England King of England, 1485–1509

Henry VII was the King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizure of the crown on 22 August 1485 to his death on 21 April 1509. He was the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Contents

Career

Thomas Richard West was the eldest son of Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr (28 October 1430 – 10 March 1476), [3] and Katherine Hungerford (d. 12 May 1493), [4] daughter of Robert Hungerford, 2nd Baron Hungerford of Heytesbury, Wiltshire, by Margaret Botreaux, daughter of William de Botreaux, 3rd Baron Botreaux, of Boscastle, Cornwall. [5]

Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr English Baron

Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr and 4th Baron West was the son of Reginald West, 6th Baron De La Warr, by his first wife, Margaret Thorley, daughter of Robert Thorley, esquire, of Tybeste, Cornwall, and his first wife, Anne de la Pole, widow of Sir Gerard de Lisle, and daughter of Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk.

Robert Hungerford, 2nd Baron Hungerford English nobleman

Robert Hungerford, 2nd Baron Hungerford (1409–1459) was an English landowner. The second but eldest surviving son of Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford, he served in the Hundred Years' War, and was summoned to parliament as Baron Hungerford from 5 September 1450 to 26 May 1455. He died 14 May 1459, and in accordance with his will was buried in Salisbury Cathedral. He was succeeded by his son Robert Hungerford, 3rd Baron Hungerford (1431–1464).

Heytesbury village in Wiltshire, England

Heytesbury is a village and a civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The village lies on the north bank of the Wylye, about 3 12 miles (5.6 km) southeast of the town of Warminster.

West served in an expedition to France in 1475. He was said to be aged 19 or more at his father's death on 10 March 1476, [6] and was granted special livery of his lands on 1 September of that year. [7] [8]

He was knighted by Henry VII on 18 January 1478, and on 4 March 1486 was granted lands in Sussex after the attainder of the Duke of Norfolk. In 1487 he was granted an annuity of £20 by Peter Courtenay, Bishop of Winchester. In 1489 he was made a Knight of the Bath at the creation of Henry VII's eldest son, Arthur Tudor, as Prince of Wales. [3] [8]

In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime. It entailed losing not only one's life, property and hereditary titles, but typically also the right to pass them on to one's heirs. Both men and women condemned of capital crimes could be attainted.

Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk British noble

Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, styled Earl of Surrey from 1483 to 1485 and again from 1489 to 1514, was an English nobleman and politician. He was the eldest son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by his first wife, Catharina de Moleyns. The Duke was the grandfather of both Queen Anne Boleyn and Queen Catherine Howard and the great grandfather of Queen Elizabeth I. He served four monarchs as a soldier and statesman.

Peter Courtenay 15th-century Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester

Peter Courtenay was Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester, and also had a successful political career during the tumultuous years of the Wars of the Roses.

He was one of the 'chief commanders' of an English force sent to Flanders in 1491 to assist the Emperor Maximilian against the French, and in 1496 was the 'chief commander' of forces raised to suppress the Cornish Rebellion, commanding a retinue at the Battle of Deptford Bridge. He was installed as a Knight of the Garter on 11 May 1510. He participated in the sieges of Therouanne and Tournai in 1513, and was made a knight banneret after the French defeat at the Battle of the Spurs on 18 August 1513. He attended Mary Tudor at her marriage to Louis XII of France in 1514, and attended Henry VIII at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520. [3] [8] In 1524 he was appointed High Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex.[ citation needed ]

Flanders Community and region of Belgium

Flanders is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium and one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. However, there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history, and sometimes involving neighbouring countries. The demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. The official capital of Flanders is Brussels, although the Brussels Capital Region has an independent regional government, and the government of Flanders only oversees the community aspects of Flanders life in Brussels such as (Flemish) culture and education.

Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor

Maximilian I was Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death. He was never crowned by the Pope, as the journey to Rome was always too risky. He was instead proclaimed Emperor elect by Pope Julius II at Trent, thus breaking the long tradition of requiring a papal coronation for the adoption of the imperial title. Maximilian was the son of Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor, and Eleanor of Portugal. He ruled jointly with his father for the last ten years of the latter's reign, from c. 1483 to his father's death in 1493.

Retinue

A retinue is a body of persons "retained" in the service of a noble, royal personage, or dignitary, a suite of "retainers".

St Mary's church, Broadwater, where Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr, was buried Broadwater parish church 2.JPG
St Mary's church, Broadwater, where Thomas West, 8th Baron De La Warr, was buried

West died 11 October 1525, and was buried at St. Mary's Church, Broadwater, Sussex. He left a will dated 8 October 1524, proved 12 February 1526. The will of his widow, Eleanor (née Copley), dated 10 May 1536, was proved on 14 November of that year. She was buried with him at Broadwater. [4] [8] [9]

Marriages and issue

West married firstly Eleanor Percy (b. 1455), daughter of Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland, and Eleanor Poynings, daughter and heiress of Sir Richard Poynings (d. 10 June 1429), by whom he had no issue. [10] [8] [11]

He married secondly, before 1482, Elizabeth Mortimer (d. 29 June 1502), the daughter of Sir Hugh Mortimer [12] of Martley and Kyre Ward, Worcestershire, by Eleanor Cornwall, daughter of Sir Edmund Cornwall, by whom he had five sons and six daughters: [8] [13] [14]

He married thirdly Eleanor Copley (c.1476-1536), daughter of Roger Copley, esquire, of London and Roughey in Horsham, Sussex, by Anne Hoo, second daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings, by whom he had three sons and four daughters: [22]

Notes

  1. Kidd, Charles, Debrett's peerage & Baronetage 2015 Edition, London, 2015, p.P336
  2. Kidd, Charles, Debrett's peerage & Baronetage 2015 Edition, London, 2015, p.P336
  3. 1 2 3 Cokayne 1916, pp. 155-6.
  4. 1 2 Cokayne 1916, p. 156.
  5. Richardson IV 2011, p. 319.
  6. According to Riordan, however, he was born in 1448.
  7. Cokayne 1916, p. 155.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Richardson IV 2011, p. 320.
  9. Nicolas 1826, pp. 605-6, 672-3.
  10. Richardson III 2011, p. 394.
  11. Norcliffe 1881, p. 243.
  12. Elizabeth Mortimer's father, Sir Hugh Mortimer, slain at the Battle of Wakefield on 30 December 1460, and Sir John Mortimer are characters in Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 3, where they are referred to as uncles of Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York.
  13. The Picards or Pychards of Stradewy (now Tretower) Castle, and Scethrog, Brecknockshire, (London: Golding and Lawrence, 1878), p. 62 Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  14. 'Parishes: Martley with Hillhampton', A History of the County of Worcester: volume 4 (1924), pp. 289-297 Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  15. Richardson IV 2011, p. 321.
  16. Cokayne 1913, pp. 316-17.
  17. 1 2 3 4 Richardson IV 2011, p. 322.
  18. The West Family Register: Important Lines Traced, 1326-1928, by Letta Brock Stone, Washington, DC: W. F. Roberts Company, 1928
  19. Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1075.
  20. Richardson IV 2011, pp. 50, 322.
  21. According to Hughes, this marriage did not take place and is attributable to an error by Dugdale.
  22. Richardson IV 2011, pp. 320-3.
  23. 1 2 3 Cokayne 1916, p. 158.
  24. Cokayne 1959, p. 522.
  25. Richardson II 2011, pp. 4-5.
  26. Richardson IV 2011, pp. 322-3.
  27. West, Leonard (by 1518-78), of Burghwallis, Yorkshire, History of Parliament Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  28. Richardson III 2011, p. 389.
  29. Cokayne 1949, p. 303.
  30. Parishes: All Cannings', A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 10 (1975), pp. 20-33 Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  31. 'Parishes : Grendon Underwood', A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 4 (1927), pp. 50-54 Retrieved 17 September 2013.
  32. Richardson II 2011, p. 314.

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References

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr
Baron De La Warr
Baron West

1475–1525
Succeeded by
Thomas West, 9th Baron De La Warr