Thomas Weston, 4th Earl of Portland

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Thomas Weston, 4th Earl of Portland (9 October 1609 – May 1688) was a younger son of the 1st Earl of Portland, by his second wife Frances Walgrave. He was born at Nayland in Suffolk, England.

Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland English politician

Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland, KG, was Chancellor of the Exchequer and later Lord Treasurer of England under James I and Charles I, being one of the most influential figures in the early years of Charles I's Personal Rule and the architect of many of the policies that enabled him to rule without raising taxes through Parliament.

Nayland village in United Kingdom

Nayland is a village and former civil parish in the Stour Valley on the Suffolk side of the border between Suffolk and Essex in England. In 2011 the built up area had a population of 938. In 188 the civil parish had a population of 901.

His elder brother Jerome succeeded their father in 1635, and passed the title to his own son, Charles, in 1662. However, the 3rd Earl did not marry and produce a direct heir of his own prior to his death in 1665, so Thomas succeeded as Earl of Portland.

Jerome Weston, 2nd Earl of Portland was an English diplomat and landowner who held the presidency of Munster, Ireland.

Charles Weston, 3rd Earl of Portland English Earl

Charles Weston, 3rd Earl of Portland, was the only son and heir of the 2nd Earl of Portland and Lady Frances Stuart.

Earl of Portland peerage of England

Earl of Portland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England, first in 1633 and again in 1689. The title Duke of Portland was created in 1716 but became extinct in 1990 upon the death of the ninth Duke, when the Earldom was inherited by a distant cousin.

Lord Portland married Anne Boteler, daughter of the 1st Baron Boteler and widow of the 1st Earl of Newport, but they had no children. When he died, his estates passed to his nieces, the daughters of the 2nd Earl, but his title became extinct.

Baron Boteler was a title that was created three times in the Peerage of England.

Mountjoy Blount, 1st Earl of Newport Master of ordnance to Charles I of England

Mountjoy Blount, 1st Earl of Newport, created Baron Mountjoy in the Irish peerage (1617), Baron Mountjoy of Thurveston in the English peerage (1627) and Earl of Newport (1628) was appointed master of ordnance to Charles I of England (1634) and played an ambiguous part in the early years of the English Civil War.

Styles from birth to death

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References

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Weston
Earl of Portland
16651688
Succeeded by
Extinct