Thomas Weston, 4th Earl of Portland

Last updated

Thomas Weston, 4th Earl of Portland (9 October 1609 – May 1688) was a younger son of the 1st Earl of Portland, by his second wife Frances Walgrave. He was born at Nayland in Suffolk, England.

His elder brother Jerome succeeded their father in 1635, and passed the title to his own son, Charles, in 1662. However, the 3rd Earl did not marry and produce a direct heir of his own prior to his death in 1665, so Thomas succeeded as Earl of Portland.

Lord Portland married Anne Boteler, daughter of the 1st Baron Boteler and widow of the 1st Earl of Newport, but they had no children. When he died, his estates passed to his nieces, the daughters of the 2nd Earl, but his title became extinct.

Related Research Articles

Earl of Derby title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Derby is a title in the Peerage of England. The title was first adopted by Robert de Ferrers, 1st Earl of Derby, under a creation of 1139. It continued with the Ferrers family until the 6th Earl forfeited his property toward the end of the reign of Henry III and died in 1279. Most of the Ferrers property and the Derby title were then held by the family of Henry III. The title merged in the Crown upon Henry IV's accession to the throne in 1399.

Duke of Buckingham, referring to Buckingham, is a title that has been created several times in the peerages of England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom. There have also been Earls of Buckingham and Marquesses of Buckingham.

Viscount Cobham peerage title

Viscount Cobham is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain that was created in 1718. Owing to its special remainder, the title has passed through several families. Since 1889, it has been held by members of the Lyttelton family.

Earl of Berkshire

Earl of Berkshire is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England. It was created for the first time in 1621 for Francis Norris, 1st Earl of Berkshire. For more information on this creation, see the Earl of Abingdon and also the Earl of Lindsey. The second creation came in 1626 in favour of Thomas Howard, 1st Viscount Andover. He was the second son of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk, second son of the second marriage of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk. His mother was Katherine, daughter of Sir Henry Knyvett of Charlton in Wiltshire. Howard had already been created Baron Howard of Charlton, in the County of Wiltshire, and Viscount Andover, in the County of Southampton, in 1622. These titles are also in the Peerage of England. Lord Berkshire succeeded to the Charlton estate through his mother in 1638. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He had already in 1640 been summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father's junior title of Baron Howard of Charlton. He had no sons and on his death in 1679 the titles passed to his younger brother, the third Earl. He represented Wallingford in the House of Commons. He also died without male issue and was succeeded by his great-nephew, the fourth Earl. He was the grandson of the Hon. William Howard, fourth son of the first Earl. In 1745 he succeeded his third cousin as eleventh Earl of Suffolk. For further history of the titles, see the Earl of Suffolk.

Earl of Portland peerage of England

Earl of Portland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England, first in 1633 and again in 1689. What proved to be a long co-held title, Duke of Portland, was created in 1716 and ceased in 1990 on the death of the ninth Duke, when the Earldom passed to the seniormost agnatic cousin, namely one of the 6th degree.

Baron Stafford English baronial title

Baron Stafford, referring to the town of Stafford, is a title that has been created several times in the Peerage of England. In the 14th century, the barons of the first creation were made earls. Those of the fifth creation, in the 17th century, became first viscounts and then earls. Since 1913, the title has been held by the Fitzherbert family.

Earl of Chichester

Earl of Chichester is a title that has been created three times in British history. The current title was created in 1801 for Thomas Pelham, 2nd Baron Pelham of Stanmer in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Earl of Bradford is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was first created in 1694 for Francis Newport, 2nd Baron Newport. However, all the Newport titles became extinct on the death of the fourth Earl in 1762. The Earldom was revived in 1815 for Orlando Bridgeman, 2nd Baron Bradford. The Bridgeman family had previously succeeded to the Newport estates. The title of the peerage refers to the ancient hundred of Bradford in Shropshire, and not, as might be assumed, to the city of Bradford, Yorkshire, or the town of Bradford-on-Avon in Wiltshire.

Baron Howard de Walden title

Baron Howard de Walden is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ of summons in 1597 by Queen Elizabeth I for Admiral Lord Thomas Howard, a younger son of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, by his second wife, the Honourable Margaret Audley, daughter of Thomas Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Walden.

Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland English politician

Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland, KG, was Chancellor of the Exchequer and later Lord Treasurer of England under James I and Charles I, being one of the most influential figures in the early years of Charles I's Personal Rule and the architect of many of the policies that enabled him to rule without raising taxes through Parliament.

Jerome Weston, 2nd Earl of Portland was an English diplomat and landowner who held the presidency of Munster, Kingdom of Ireland.

Charles Weston, 3rd Earl of Portland English Earl

Charles Weston, 3rd Earl of Portland, was the only son and heir of the 2nd Earl of Portland and Lady Frances Stuart.

James Ley, 1st Earl of Marlborough English politician and judge

James Ley, 1st Earl of Marlborough was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1597 and 1622. He was Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench in Ireland and then in England and was Lord High Treasurer from 1624 to 1628. On 31 December 1624, James I created him Baron Ley, of Ley in the County of Devon, and on 5 February 1626, Charles I created him Earl of Marlborough. Both titles became extinct upon the death of the 4th Earl of Marlborough in 1679.

Earl of Egremont

Earl of Egremont was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1749, along with the subsidiary title Baron of Cockermouth, in the County of Cumberland, for Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset, with remainder to his nephews Sir Charles Wyndham, 4th Baronet, of Orchard Wyndham, and Percy Wyndham-O'Brien. The Duke had previously inherited the Percy estates, including the lands of Egremont in Cumberland, from his mother Lady Elizabeth Percy, daughter and heiress of Joceline Percy, 11th Earl of Northumberland. In 1750 Sir Charles Wyndham succeeded according to the special remainder as second Earl of Egremont on the death of his uncle. His younger brother Percy Wyndham-O'Brien was created Earl of Thomond in 1756.

Charles Butler, 1st Earl of Arran Irish peer and soldier

Lieutenant-General Charles Butler, 1st Earl of Arran, de jure3rd Duke of Ormonde was an Irish peer. His uncle Richard was the 1st Earl of Arran of the first creation. The titles were re-created for Charles in 1693. He was the younger son of Thomas Butler 6th Earl of Ossory and Emilia von Nassau. His paternal grandfather was the 1st Duke of Ormonde and his elder brother was the 2nd Duke of Ormonde.

John Kennedy, 8th Earl of Cassilis was a Scottish peer. He succeeded to the titles of 10th Lord Kennedy and 8th Earl of Cassilis on 23 July 1701.

Ralph Boteler, 1st Baron Sudeley English politician

Ralph Boteler, 1st Baron Sudeley and 6th Baron Sudeley KG was an English baron and aristocrat. He was the Captain of Calais and Treasurer of England.

Sir William Armine, 2nd Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1646 to 1653.

John Boteler, 1st Baron Boteler of Brantfield, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1625 to 1626. The Butlers of Hertfordshire claimed descent from Ralph le Boteler, butler to Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and Earl of Leicester in the time of Henry I, and by the 15th century they had been seated at Watton for some time.

Villiers family English aristocratic family

The Villiers family is one of England's preeminent aristocratic families. Over time, various members of the Villiers family were made knights, baronets and peers. Peerages held by the Villiers family include the dukedoms of Buckingham (1623-1687) and Cleveland (1670-1709), as well as the earldoms of Anglesey (1623-1661), Jersey and Clarendon. Perhaps the most prominent members of the family were those who received the two dukedoms: George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628) rose to fame and influence as favourite of King James I of England, while Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland (1640–1709) became a mistress of King Charles II of England, by whom she had five children.

References

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Weston
Earl of Portland
16651688
Succeeded by
Extinct