Thomas Wetmore

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Thomas Wetmore (September 20, 1767 March 22, 1828) was a lawyer and political figure in New Brunswick.

New Brunswick province in Canada

New Brunswick is one of four Atlantic provinces on the east coast of Canada. According to the Constitution of Canada, New Brunswick is the only bilingual province. About two thirds of the population declare themselves anglophones and a third francophones. One third of the overall population describe themselves as bilingual. Atypically for Canada, only about half of the population lives in urban areas, mostly in Greater Moncton, Greater Saint John and the capital Fredericton.

He was born in Rye, New York, the son of Timothy Wetmore and Jane Haviland. He came to New Brunswick after the American Revolution in 1783, first settling at Carleton (later Saint John) and then Gagetown. Wetmore studied law with Ward Chipman and was admitted to the bar in 1790. He was named clerk for the Inferior Court of Common Pleas and registrar of deeds for Carleton County. In 1793, he married Sarah Peters. He served as lieutenant-colonel in the militia. In 1809, Wetmore was elected to the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick for St. John County; he did not run for reelection in 1816. In the same year, he was named Attorney General for the colony and served in the post until his death on his estate near Fredericton at the age of 60. Wetmore was named to the colony's ruling Council in 1817. He also served as justice of the peace for York County.

Rye (town), New York Town in New York, United States

Rye is a town in Westchester County, New York, United States. The population was 45,928 at the 2010 census. It is a separate municipality from the city of Rye. The town of Rye contains two villages – Port Chester and Rye Brook – along with a portion of the Rye Neck section of the village of Mamaroneck. These villages comprise the entire area of the town of Rye.

American Revolution Political upheaval, 1775–1783

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in alliance with France and others.

Saint John, New Brunswick City in New Brunswick, Canada

Saint John is the coastal port city of the Bay of Fundy in the Canadian province of New Brunswick. The port is Canada’s third largest port by tonnage with a cargo base that includes dry and liquid bulk, break bulk, containers, and cruise. In 2016, after more than 40 years of population decline, the city became the second most populous city in the province for the first time, with a population of 67,575 over an area of 315.82 square kilometres (121.94 sq mi). The Saint John metropolitan area covers a land area of 3,362.95 square kilometres (1,298.44 sq mi) across the Caledonia Highlands, with a population of 126,202. After the partitioning of the colony of Nova Scotia in 1784, the new colony of New Brunswick was thought to be named 'New Ireland' with the capital to be in Saint John before being vetoed by Britain's King George III. Saint John is the oldest incorporated city in Canada. During the reign of George III, the municipality was created by royal charter in 1785.

His son George Ludlow Wetmore predeceased his father, dying in a duel in 1821.

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