Thomas Wharton (died 1684)

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Sir Thomas Wharton
by
Anthony van Dyck (1639) Anthony-van-Dyck-Portrait-of-Sir-Thomas-Wharton-1639.jpg
Sir Thomas Wharton
by
Anthony van Dyck (1639)

Sir Thomas Wharton (c. 1615 – 30 October 1684) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1659 and 1660.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Wharton was the son of Sir Thomas Wharton of Aske Hall and his wife Lady Philadelphia Carey, daughter of Robert Carey, 1st Earl of Monmouth. His father died in 1622. He was educated at Eton College from 1624 to 1625 and matriculated at Exeter College, Oxford on 3 March 1626, aged 11. He was created Knight of the Bath on 2 February 1626. From 1629 to 1632 he travelled abroad in France and entered Lincoln's Inn in 1638. [1]

Sir Thomas Wharton was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1614 and 1622.

Aske Hall Grade I listed English country house in Richmondshire, United Kingdom

Aske Hall is a Georgian country house, with parkland attributed to Capability Brown, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Richmond, North Yorkshire, England. It contains an impressive collection of 18th-century furniture, paintings and porcelain, and in its grounds a John Carr stable block converted into a chapel in Victorian times with Italianate decor, a Gothic-style folly built by Daniel Garrett circa 1745, coach house with carriage, Victorian stable block, walled garden, terraced garden and lake with a Roman-style temple. The hall and estate are currently owned by the Marquess of Zetland.

Robert Carey, 1st Earl of Monmouth English politician

Robert Carey, 1st Earl of Monmouth was an English nobleman and courtier. He was the youngest son of Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, chamberlain and first cousin of Queen Elizabeth I, and Anne Morgan, daughter of Sir Thomas Morgan and Anne Whitney.

In 1659, Wharton was elected Member of Parliament for Westmorland in the Third Protectorate Parliament. [2] He was re-elected MP for Westmorland in 1660 for the Convention Parliament. [1]

Westmorland was a constituency covering the county of Westmorland in the North of England, which returned Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Third Protectorate Parliament

The Third Protectorate Parliament sat for one session, from 27 January 1659 until 22 April 1659, with Chaloner Chute and Thomas Bampfylde as the Speakers of the House of Commons. It was a bicameral Parliament, with an Upper House having a power of veto over the Commons.

Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year. Elected as a "free parliament", i.e. with no oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth or to the monarchy, it was predominantly Royalist in its membership. It assembled for the first time on 25 April 1660.

Wharton married firstly in 1645, his cousin Lady Mary Carey daughter of Henry Carey, 1st Earl of Dover and had a son, Philip, and three daughters. She died in June 1672 and he married secondly by licence dated 20 April 1677, Jane Robinson, widow of Leonard Robinson of Ravensworth, Yorkshire and daughter of Rowland Dand of Mansfield Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire. They had two daughters. [1] His elder brother Philip inherited the barony from their grandfather.

Cousin marriage marriage between related people

Cousin marriage is marriage between cousins. Opinions and practice vary widely across the world. In some cultures and communities, cousin marriage is considered ideal and actively encouraged; in others, it is subject to social stigma. In some countries, this practice is common; in others it is uncommon but still legal. In others, it is seen as incestuous and is legally prohibited: it is banned in China and Taiwan, North Korea, South Korea, the Philippines and 24 of the 50 United States. Supporters of cousin marriage where it is banned may view the prohibition as discrimination, while opponents may appeal to moral or other arguments. Worldwide, more than 10% of marriages are between first or second cousins.

Henry Carey, 1st Earl of Dover was an English peer, and member of parliament in 1609 and 1614.

Philip Wharton, 4th Baron Wharton English Baron

Philip Wharton, 4th Baron Wharton was an English soldier, politician and diplomat. He was a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War.

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Burton
Christopher Lister
Member of Parliament for Westmorland
1659
With: Thomas Burton
Succeeded by
Not represented in restored Rump
Preceded by
Not represented in restored Rump
Member of Parliament for Westmorland
1660
With: Sir John Lowther
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Strickland
Sir Philip Musgrave