Thomas Wheatley

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Thomas Wheatley
(locomotive engineer)
Born1821
Died13 March 1883
NationalityBritish
OccupationEngineer
Engineering career
DisciplineMechanical engineering

Thomas Wheatley (1821–1883) was an English mechanical engineer who worked for several British railway companies and rose to become a Locomotive Superintendent at the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) and the North British Railway (NBR).

London and North Western Railway former railway company in United Kingdom

The London and North Western Railway was a British railway company between 1846 and 1922. In the late 19th century the L&NWR was the largest joint stock company in the United Kingdom.

North British Railway British pre-grouping railway company (1844–1922)

The North British Railway was a British railway company, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. It was established in 1844, with the intention of linking with English railways at Berwick. The line opened in 1846, and from the outset the Company followed a policy of expanding its geographical area, and competing with the Caledonian Railway in particular. In doing so it committed huge sums of money, and in doing so incurred shareholder disapproval that resulted in two chairmen leaving the company.

Contents

Career

He became an apprentice with the Leeds and Selby Railway and later worked for the Midland Railway and the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway. Subsequently, he was Locomotive Superintendent for the Southern Division of the London and North Western Railway for 5 years. From 1867 to 1874 he was Locomotive Superintendent of the North British Railway (NBR). Prior to 1867 the post had been split across divisions. [2]

The Leeds and Selby Railway was an early British railway company and first mainline railway within Yorkshire. It was opened in 1834.

Midland Railway British pre-grouping railway company (1844–1922)

The Midland Railway (MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom from 1844 to 1922, when it became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. It had a large network of lines managed from its headquarters in Derby. It became the third-largest railway undertaking in the British Isles.

Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway

The Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR) was formed by amalgamation in 1847. The MS&LR changed its name to the Great Central Railway in 1897 in anticipation of the opening in 1899 of its London Extension.

Locomotives

Under Wheatley's superintendency, 185 new locomotives were added to NBR stock, and a number of old engines were rebuilt for further service. [3] Only eight of the new locomotives were intended for express passenger trains. [4] Locomotives designed by Thomas Wheatley included:

NBR classPower classTypeIntroducedDriving wheelTotalGroupingLNER classExtinctNotes
141 2-4-0 18696 ft 6 in (1,980 mm)21915 [5]
38 2-4-0 18696 ft 0 in (1,830 mm)11912 [6]
418 P 2-4-0 18736 ft 0 in (1,830 mm)86E71927 [7] [8]
40 2-4-0 18735 ft 0 in (1,520 mm)21903 [9]
224 4-4-0 18716 ft 6 in (1,980 mm)21919 [10]
420 4-4-0 18736 ft 6 in (1,980 mm)41918 [11]
251 E 0-6-0 18674 ft 3 in (1,300 mm)383J841924 [12] [13]
56 0-6-0 18685 ft 0 in (1,520 mm)81914 [14]
17 0-6-0 18694 ft 6 in (1,370 mm)11914 [15]
396 E 0-6-0 18675 ft 0 in (1,520 mm)8837J311937 [16] [17] [18]
293 0-6-0 18725 ft 0 in (1,520 mm)11907 [19]
357 0-4-0 18685 ft 3 in (1,600 mm)21Y10 [20] 1925 [21] [22]
226 E 0-6-0ST 18705 ft 0 in (1,520 mm)21J861924 [23] [24]
229 1871151J811924 [25] [26]
112 0-6-0ST 18704 ft 6 in (1,370 mm)31910 [27]
282 0-6-0ST 18664 ft 1 in (1,240 mm)31921 [28]
130 E 0-6-0ST 18704 ft 3 in (1,300 mm)101J851924 [29] [30]
32 0-6-0ST 18743 ft 6 in (1,070 mm)61907 [31]
18 0-4-0ST 18723 ft 0 in (910 mm)21906 [32]

See also

Notes

  1. Wheatley, Thomas in Brief Biographies of Major Mechanical Engineers archived from steamindex.com
  2. Marsden & (Thomas Wheatley)
  3. SLS 1970 , p. 62
  4. SLS 1970 , p. 63
  5. SLS 1970 , pp. 62–63
  6. SLS 1970 , pp. 63–64
  7. SLS 1970 , pp. 64–65
  8. Boddy et al. 1968 , pp. 154–6
  9. SLS 1970 , pp. 65–66
  10. SLS 1970 , pp. 66–67
  11. SLS 1970 , pp. 67–68
  12. SLS 1970 , pp. 68–70
  13. Allen et al. 1971 , pp. 68–70
  14. SLS 1970 , pp. 70–71
  15. SLS 1970 , p. 71
  16. SLS 1970 , pp. 71–75
  17. Fry 1966 , pp. 188–194
  18. Marsden & (The Wheatley J31)
  19. SLS 1970 , p. 75
  20. Marsden & (The Wheatley Y10)
  21. SLS 1970 , pp. 75–76
  22. Boddy et al. 1984 , pp. 164–6
  23. SLS 1970 , pp. 76–77
  24. Allen et al. 1971 , pp. 72–74
  25. SLS 1970 , pp. 76–77
  26. Allen et al. 1971 , pp. 56–59
  27. SLS 1970 , pp. 77–78
  28. SLS 1970 , pp. 78–79
  29. SLS 1970 , pp. 79–80
  30. Allen et al. 1971 , pp. 70–72
  31. SLS 1970 , p. 80
  32. SLS 1970 , pp. 80–81

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Business positions
Preceded by
See above
Locomotive Superintendent of the North British Railway
1867–1874
Succeeded by
Dugald Drummond
1875–1882