Thomas Whetham

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Thomas Whetham (c. 1665 – 28 April 1741) was an English soldier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1722 and 1727.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Family and early life

Whetham was born circa 1665, the first son of the barrister Nathaniel Whetham, of the Inner Temple. His grandfather was Colonel Nathaniel Whetham, who had served in the parliamentary army during the English Civil War. [1] Thomas Whetham's mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Adrian Scrope of Wormesley, Oxfordshire. Thomas's father died in 1667, and he went on to enter military service, joining the 1st Foot as an ensign in 1685. [1]

Barrister lawyer specialized in court representation in Wales, England and some other jurisdictions

A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions. Often, barristers are also recognised as legal scholars.

Inner Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Nathaniel Whetham was an English baker and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1654 and 1659. He fought in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.

Military and political career

He transferred to Sir James Lesley's Regiment of Foot in 1694 with the rank of captain lieutenant, and was promoted to captain later that year. He was serving with the 11th Foot as major sometime prior to 1700, and was then with the 27th Foot with the rank of colonel between 1702 and 1705. [1] He was promoted to brigadier-general in 1707. He became Commander-in-Chief, Canada in 1709, was promoted to major-general in 1710 and was then appointed Commander-in-Chief, Scotland in 1712. His service had taken him to Scotland, the West Indies and Spain by this stage. [1]

Captain lieutenant or captain-lieutenant is a military rank, used in a number of navies worldwide and formerly in the British Army. It is generally equivalent to the Commonwealth or US naval rank of lieutenant, and has the NATO rank code of OF-2, though this can vary.

Captain (Capt) is a junior officer rank of the British Army and Royal Marines and in both services it ranks above lieutenant and below major with a NATO ranking code of OF-2. The rank is equivalent to a lieutenant in the Royal Navy and to a flight lieutenant in the Royal Air Force. The rank of captain in the Royal Navy is considerably more senior and the two ranks should not be confused.

Major (Maj) is a military rank which is used by both the British Army and Royal Marines. The rank is superior to captain, and subordinate to lieutenant colonel. The insignia for a major is a crown. The equivalent rank in the Royal Navy is lieutenant commander, and squadron leader in the Royal Air Force.

Whetham served under the Duke of Argyll during the Jacobite rising of 1715, commanding the left wing of the government army at the Battle of Sheriffmuir on 13 November 1715. [1] He entered politics in 1722, contesting and being returned to sit for Barnstaple in 1722. He relinquished the seat in 1727 and did not stand for parliament again. [1] He was appointed colonel of the 12th Foot in 1725, holding the appointment until his death. Further promotions followed, to lieutenant-general in 1727 and then general in 1739. He acquired the manors of Kirklington and Hockerton in Nottinghamshire for the sum of £25,000 some time around 1739, and in 1740 he became Governor of Berwick and Holy Island. [1] He had married Mary, daughter of Edward Thompson of Marston, Yorkshire, with whom he had one son and one daughter. General Thomas Whetham died on 28 April 1741. [1]

John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll led government army against Jacobites in 1715

Field Marshal John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, 1st Duke of Greenwich,, styled Lord Lorne from 1680 to 1703, was a Scottish nobleman and senior commander in the British Army. He served on the continent in the Nine Years' War and fought at the Battle of Kaiserwerth during the War of the Spanish Succession. He went on to serve as a brigade commander during the later battles of the War of the Spanish Succession. Next he was given command of all British forces in Spain at the instigation of the Harley Ministry; after conducting a successful evacuation of the troops from Spain, he became Commander-in-Chief, Scotland. During the Jacobite Rebellion, he led the government army against the Jacobites led by the Earl of Mar at the Battle of Sheriffmuir. He went on to serve as Lord Steward and then Master-General of the Ordnance under the Walpole–Townshend Ministry.

Jacobite rising of 1715

The Jacobite rising of 1715, was the attempt by James Francis Edward Stuart to regain the thrones of England, Ireland and Scotland for the exiled House of Stuart.

Battle of Sheriffmuir battle at the height of the 1715 Jacobite Rising in England and Scotland

The Battle of Sheriffmuir was an engagement in 1715 at the height of the Jacobite rising in England and Scotland. The battlefield has been included in the Inventory of Historic Battlefields in Scotland and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009. Sheriffmuir was and is a remote elevated plateau of heathland lying between Stirling and Auchterarder on the north fringe of the Ochil Hills.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Whetham, Thomas (c.1665-1741), of Turnham Green, Mdx". History of Parliament. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Rolle
Sir Hugh Acland
Member of Parliament for Barnstaple
1722–1727
With: Sir Hugh Acland
Succeeded by
Richard Coffin
Theophilus Fortescue