Thomas White (Australian politician)

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  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Rickard, John (2002). "White, Sir Thomas Walter (1888–1957)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  2. "Col. T.W. White". The Prahran Telegraph . Prahran, Victoria. 7 January 1927. p. 5. Retrieved 4 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  3. "Naval and military". The Mercury . Hobart. 15 April 1931. p. 3. Retrieved 4 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  4. 1 2 3 "White, Thomas Walter". National Archives of Australia. p. 83. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  5. Stephens, The Royal Australian Air Force, pp. 3–4
  6. Molkentin, Fire in the Sky, p. 7
  7. Molkentin, Fire in the Sky, p. 8
  8. Campbell-Wright, An Interesting Point, pp. 38, 164
  9. Campbell-Wright, An Interesting Point, p. 39
  10. Molkentin, Fire in the Sky, p. 10
  11. Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, pp. 1–3
  12. Stephens, The Royal Australian Air Force, pp. 5–6
  13. Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, pp. 16–19
  14. 1 2 Stephens, The Royal Australian Air Force, p. 7
  15. Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, p. 19
  16. Molkentin, Fire in the Sky, p. 19
  17. Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, pp. 19–20
  18. Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, p. 22
  19. "No. 29665". The London Gazette (Supplement). 13 July 1916. pp. 6959–6960.
  20. 1 2 Cutlack, The Australian Flying Corps, pp. 27–28
  21. "No. 31378". The London Gazette (Supplement). 3 June 1919. pp. 7031–7032.
  22. "No. 31691". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 December 1919. pp. 15613–15614.
  23. White, Thomas Walter (1928). Guests of the Unspeakable: The Odyssey of an Australian Airman – Being a Record of Captivity and Escape in Turkey. London: John Hamilton. ISBN   1-86315-000-5.
  24. 1 2 Rickard, John (2002). "White, Vera Deakin (1891–1978)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 20 March 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  25. Dennis, P., Grey, J., Morris, E., Prior, R., & Bou, J. (2008). "Army, Titles of" . The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 5 July 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  26. "Australian Military Forces". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette . Canberra. 29 March 1923. p. 441. Retrieved 5 June 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  27. "No. 27085". The London Gazette . 2 June 1899. p. 3517.
  28. "The outbreak". The Sydney Morning Herald . Sydney. 5 November 1923. p. 9. Retrieved 8 July 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  29. "Maribyrnong". The Age . Melbourne. 25 November 1925. p. 12. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  30. "Balaclava election". The Age. Melbourne. 5 August 1929. p. 8. Retrieved 31 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  31. "The Balaclava election". The West Australian . Perth. 7 August 1929. p. 16. Retrieved 5 July 2019 via National Library of Australia.
  32. "Federal election". The Argus . Melbourne. 17 October 1929. p. 10. Retrieved 31 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  33. "Declaration of Balaclava poll". The Argus. Melbourne. 23 December 1931. p. 7. Retrieved 31 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  34. "Latest Federal election figures from all the states". The Herald . Melbourne. 17 September 1934. p. 10. Retrieved 31 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  35. Hill, A.J. (1983). "Gullett, Sir Henry Somer (1878–1940)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  36. 1 2 "House of Representatives". The Chronicle . Adelaide. 28 October 1937. p. 42. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  37. "The Fateful Year". Yad Vashem . Retrieved 20 March 2018.
  38. Sykes, Cross Roads to Israel, pp. 198–199
  39. Martin, Robert Menzies: A Life Volume I, p. 237
  40. Henderson, Joseph Lyons, p. 412
  41. "New cabinet stir". The Courier-Mail . Brisbane. 9 November 1938. p. 1. Retrieved 25 May 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  42. Henderson, Joseph Lyons, p. 419
  43. "Mr Menzies leader of UAP". The Argus. Melbourne. 19 April 1939. p. 1. Retrieved 20 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  44. Coulthard-Clark, The Third Brother, p. 226
  45. 1 2 Gillison, Royal Australian Air Force, p. 97
  46. "19,155 majority in Balaclava". The Argus. Melbourne. 9 October 1940. p. 5. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  47. RAAF Historical Section, Training Units, pp. 44–45
  48. Gillison, Royal Australian Air Force, p. 35
  49. Herington, Air War Against Germany and Italy, pp. 124–127
  50. Herington, Air War Against Germany and Italy, p. 541
  51. Herington, Air War Against Germany and Italy, p. 551
  52. Parliamentary Library (26 March 2007). Commonwealth Members of Parliament who have served in war (PDF) (Report). pp. 9–10. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  53. "Who's who in the elections". The Age. Melbourne. 10 August 1943. p. 3. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  54. 1 2 "Full list of today's candidates". The Sydney Morning Herald. Sydney. 28 September 1946. p. 2. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  55. RAAF Historical Section, Training Units, p. 178
  56. "White, Thomas Walter". World War 2 Nominal Roll. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  57. "Canberra commentary". The Argus. Melbourne. 21 October 1944. p. 11. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  58. Ian Hancock. "The Origins of the Modern Liberal Party". Harold White Fellowships. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  59. Helson, The Private Air Marshal, pp. 316–318
  60. 1 2 "Majority for Opposition likely in Victoria". The Canberra Times . Canberra. 5 December 1949. p. 4. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  61. "Voting in 1949 and today's nominations". Townsville Daily Bulletin . Townsville, Queensland. 28 April 1951. p. 7. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  62. Martin, Robert Menzies: A Life Volume II, pp. 129–130
  63. Stephens, Going Solo, pp. 15, 326
  64. "Air Minister states policy". Daily Mercury . Mackay, Queensland. 22 December 1949. p. 1. Retrieved 26 May 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  65. "Speedy plane". The Sydney Morning Herald. Sydney. 13 January 1950. p. 1. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  66. "1950 a fine year for RAAF". The Queensland Times . Ipswich, Queensland. 8 January 1951. p. 3. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  67. Stephens, The Royal Australian Air Force, pp. 205, 209, 244
  68. Stephens, Going Solo, pp. 73, 347
  69. Helson, The Private Air Marshal, pp. 348–352
  70. Stephens, Going Solo, p. 326
  71. "404 candidates for Federal seats". The Age. Melbourne. 7 April 1951. p. 6. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  72. "Mr. White won 10th election". The Age. Melbourne. 11 May 1951. p. 4. Retrieved 1 April 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  73. "20th Parliament to meet for last session on April 6". The Examiner. Launceston. 24 March 1954. p. 19. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  74. "Three new ministers". The Canberra Times. Canberra. 11 May 1951. p. 1. Retrieved 26 May 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  75. "No. 39422". The London Gazette (Supplement). 1 January 1952. p. 38.
  76. "Immigration pact with UK renewed". The Advocate . Burnie, Tasmania. 2 April 1954. p. 2. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  77. "Migrants needed". The Mercury. Hobart. 16 August 1954. p. 10. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  78. Macintyre, Stuart (1996). "Harrison, Sir Eric John (1892–1974)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 25 May 2018 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  79. "Memorial service to Sir Thomas White". The Canberra Times. Canberra. 17 October 1957. p. 3. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  80. Pearn, J.P. (April 2012). "Pioneer aviation and a medical legacy: The T.W. White Society Prize for Thoracic Research" (PDF). Journal of Military and Veterans' Health. Vol. 20, no. 2. pp. 40–42. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  81. "Papers of Sir Thomas White (1888–1957)". Canberra. Retrieved 25 March 2018 via National Library of Australia.

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References

Further reading

Sir Thomas White
KBE , DFC , VD
Thomas White - Spencer Shier (cropped).jpg
Thomas White, Melbourne, c.1940
Minister for Air and Civil Aviation
In office
19 December 1949 11 May 1951
Political offices
Preceded by Minister for Trade and Customs
1932–1938
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Air
1949–1951
Succeeded by
Minister for Civil Aviation
1949–1951
Succeeded by
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by Member for Balaclava
1929–1951
Succeeded by
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Vacant
Last held by: Jack Beasley
Australian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom
1951–1956
Succeeded by