Thomas White (patriot)

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Thomas White (March 19, 1739 – September 13, 1820) was an Irish American Patriot who took part in the Boston Tea Party, was a member of the Sons of Liberty, and served under General Washington in the American Revolution.

Boston Tea Party political protest in Boston in the British colony of Massachusetts

The Boston Tea Party was a political and mercantile protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1773. The target was the Tea Act of May 10, 1773, which allowed the British East India company to sell tea from China in American colonies without paying taxes apart from those imposed by the Townshend Acts. American Patriots strongly opposed the taxes in the Townshend Act as a violation of their rights. Demonstrators, some disguised as Native Americans, destroyed an entire shipment of tea sent by the East India Company.

Sons of Liberty dissident organization during the American Revolution from Boston

The Sons of Liberty was a secret organization that was created in the Thirteen American Colonies to advance the rights of the European colonists and to fight taxation by the British government. It played a major role in most colonies in battling the Stamp Act in 1765. The group officially disbanded after the Stamp Act was repealed. However, the name was applied to other local separatist groups during the years preceding the American Revolution.

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Early life

White was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1739. Around 1771, he immigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a tailor, and married Elizabeth Jones. They removed to Boston shortly thereafter, where White joined a Masonic order, possibly St. Andrews Lodge, and participated in all the anti-Crown protests. [1]

Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, members of the St. Andrew's Lodge and others boarded British vessels disguised as Indians, and threw shipments of tea into the harbor to protest the Tea Act. Thomas White was among the participants. [2] [3]

Tea Act 1773 act

Tea Act 1773 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain. The principal objective was to reduce the massive amount of tea held by the financially troubled British East India Company in its London warehouses and to help the financially struggling company survive. A related objective was to undercut the price of illegal tea, smuggled into Britain's North American colonies. This was supposed to convince the colonists to purchase Company tea on which the Townshend duties were paid, thus implicitly agreeing to accept Parliament's right of taxation. Smuggled tea was a large issue for Britain and the East India company, since approximately 86% of all the tea in America at the time was smuggled Dutch tea.

American Revolution

White returned to Pennsylvania, serving as soldier in the Continental Army in 2nd Pennsylvania Regiment in the American Revolution [1]

2nd Pennsylvania Regiment

The 2nd Pennsylvania Regiment, formed with lauded veterans from the 1st Pennsylvania Battalion - was raised in December 1776. The 1st Pennsylvania Battalion was raised in October 1775, under the command of Colonel

Later years

Following the war, his family migrated west, settling in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. He built a farm and raised his children there, who numbered 21. Three of his sons served in the War of 1812; one of them, Ezekiel White, was captured at the Battle of Lundy's Lane, and died of dysentery at a prison camp. [1] White is buried in Bedford County, PA. [4]

Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Huntingdon County is a county located in the center of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,913. Its county seat is Huntingdon. The county was created on September 20, 1787, mainly from the north part of Bedford County, plus an addition of territory on the east from Cumberland County.

War of 1812 32-month military conflict between the United States and the British Empire

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815. Historians in Britain often see it as a minor theater of the Napoleonic Wars; in the United States and Canada, it is seen as a war in its own right.

Battle of Lundys Lane battle

The Battle of Lundy's Lane was a battle of the Anglo-American War of 1812, which took place on 25 July 1814, in present-day Niagara Falls, Ontario. It was one of the bloodiest battles of the war, and one of the deadliest battles ever fought in Canada.

Monument

On July 4, 1899, members of patriot societies unveiled a monument in honor of White, located at the Evans Cemetery in Bedford County. [5]

Related Research Articles

American Revolution Political upheaval, 1775–1783

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in alliance with France and others.

Bedford County, Pennsylvania County in the United States

Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,762. The county seat is Bedford.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Thomas White Biography", USGenWebArchives, Retrieved 30 sept 2009.
  2. "Boston Tea Party Participants", Boston Tea Party, Retrieved 30 sept 2009.
  3. "The Colonial Magazine", The Colonial Magazine, p. 197, Retrieved 30 sept 2009.
  4. "Thomas White". Find a Grave . Retrieved 11 April 2017.
  5. Fairfield [Iowa] Ledger, August 9, 1899. Also The Hyndman Bulletin, Hyndman, PA