Thomas Whiteside (Archbishop of Liverpool)

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Thomas Whiteside (17 April 1857 – 28 January 1921) was an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Bishop of Liverpool (1894–1911) before being elevated to Archbishop of Liverpool (1911–1921). [1]

English people Nation and ethnic group native to England

The English people are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD. England is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.

Prelate high-ranking member of the clergy

A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others.

The Archbishop of Liverpool is the ordinary of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool and metropolitan of the Province of Liverpool in England.

Born in Lancaster, Lancashire on 17 April 1857, he was ordained to the priesthood on 30 May 1885. He was appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Liverpool on 12 July 1894.

Lancaster, Lancashire county town of Lancashire, England

Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, England. It is on the River Lune and has a population of 52,234; the wider City of Lancaster local government district has a population of 138,375.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool archdiocese

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool is an archdiocese of the Catholic Church that covers the Isle of Man and part of North West England. The episcopal see is Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. The Archdiocese is the centre of the Ecclesiastical Province of Liverpool which covers the north of England as well as the Isle of Man.

His consecration to the Episcopate took place on 15 August 1894, the principal consecrator was Cardinal Herbert Vaughan, Archbishop of Westminster, and the principal co-consecrators were Bishop WIlliam Gordon of Leeds and Bishop John Bilsborrow of Salford. Whiteside became the Metropolitan Archbishop of Liverpool on 28 October 1911 when the diocese was elevated to the status of a metropolitan archdiocese. [1] He died in office on 28 January 1921, aged 63. [1]

Consecration is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups. The origin of the word comes from the Latin word consecrat, which means dedicated, devoted, and sacred. A synonym for to consecrate is to sanctify; a distinct antonym is to desecrate.

Episcopal polity Hierarchical form of church governance

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican, and Lutheran churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages.

Consecrator bishop who makes a person into a priest or another bishop

In the Roman Catholic Church, a consecrator is a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican communities.

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George Ambrose Burton was an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He served as Bishop of Clifton from 1902 to 1931.

Bernard O’Reilly (1824–1894) was an Irish-born prelate who served as the third Roman Catholic Bishop of Liverpool from 1873 until his death in 1894.

Frederick Keating Catholic bishop

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Archbishop Thomas Whiteside". Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved 28 June 2011.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Bernard O’Reilly
Bishop of Liverpool
1894–1911
Title elevated
New title Archbishop of Liverpool
1911–1921
Succeeded by
Frederick William Keating