Thomas Whittaker (martyr)

Last updated

Thomas Whittaker (Whitaker) (1614 at Burnley, Lancashire executed 7 August 1646 at Lancaster) was an English Roman Catholic priest. A Catholic martyr, he was beatified in 1987.

Burnley market town in Lancashire, England

Burnley is a town in Lancashire, England, with a 2001 population of 73,021. It is 21 miles (34 km) north of Manchester and 20 miles (32 km) east of Preston, at the confluence of the River Calder and River Brun.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Lancaster, Lancashire county town of Lancashire, England

Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, England. It is on the River Lune and has a population of 52,234; the wider City of Lancaster local government district has a population of 138,375.

Life

Son of Thomas Whitaker, schoolmaster, and Helen, his wife, he was educated first at his father's school. By the influence of the Towneley family he was then sent to Valladolid, where he studied for the priesthood.

Valladolid Municipality in Castile and León, Spain

Valladolid is a city in Spain and the de facto capital of the autonomous community of Castile and León. It has a population of 309,714 people, making it Spain's 13th most populous municipality and northwestern Spain's biggest city. Its metropolitan area ranks 20th in Spain with a population of 414,244 people in 23 municipalities.

After ordination (1638) he returned to England, and for five years worked in Lancashire. On one occasion he was arrested, but escaped while being conducted to Lancaster Castle.

Ordination is the process by which individuals are consecrated, that is, set apart as clergy to perform various religious rites and ceremonies. The process and ceremonies of ordination vary by religion and denomination. One who is in preparation for, or who is undergoing the process of ordination is sometimes called an ordinand. The liturgy used at an ordination is sometimes referred to as an ordination.

Lancaster Castle Grade I listed castle in Lancaster, United Kingdom

Lancaster Castle is a medieval castle in Lancaster in the English county of Lancashire. Its early history is unclear, but may have been founded in the 11th century on the site of a Roman fort overlooking a crossing of the River Lune. In 1164, the Honour of Lancaster, including the castle, came under royal control. In 1322 and 1389 the Scots invaded England, progressing as far as Lancaster and damaging the castle. It was not to see military action again until the English Civil War. The castle was first used as a prison in 1196 although this aspect became more important during the English Civil War. The castle buildings are owned by the British sovereign as Duke of Lancaster, which leases part of the structure to Lancashire County Council who operate a Crown Court in part of the building.

He was again seized at Blacke Hall in Goosnargh, and committed to Lancaster Castle, 7 August 1643, undergoing solitary confinement for six weeks. For three years he remained in prison. Before his trial he made a month's retreat in preparation for death.

Goosnargh village in the United Kingdom

Goosnargh is a village and civil parish in the City of Preston district of Lancashire, England. The village lies between Broughton and Longridge, and mostly lies in the civil parish of Whittingham, although the ancient centre lies in the civil parish of Goosnargh. The parish of Goosnargh had a population of 1,204 recorded in the 2001 census, increasing to 1,316 at the 2011 Census.

Solitary confinement is a form of imprisonment distinguished by living in single cells with little or no meaningful contact to other inmates, strict measures to control contraband, and the use of additional security measures and equipment. It is specifically designed for disruptive inmates that are security risks to other inmates, the prison staff, or the prison itself. It is mostly employed for violations of discipline, such as murder, hostage-taking, deadly assault, and rioting. However, it is also used as a measure of protection for inmates, whose safety is threatened by other inmates. Prison authorities consider solitary confinement an administrative placement measure, not a punishment.

He declined all attempts made to induce him to conform to Anglicanism by the offer of his life. He was executed with Edward Bamber and John Woodcock, saying to the sheriff: "Use your pleasure with me, a reprieve or even a pardon upon your conditions I utterly refuse".

Anglicanism The practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.

Edward Bamber was an English Roman Catholic priest. He was beatified in 1987.

John WoodcockO.F.M. (1603–1646) was a Franciscan priest from Lancashire executed in August 1646 under the 1585 "Act against Jesuits, Seminary priests and other such like disobedient persons" for being a priest and present in the realm.

Related Research Articles

Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster 13th and 14th-century English nobleman

Thomas, Earl of Leicester and Lancaster was an English nobleman. A junior member of the House of Plantagenet, he was one of the leaders of the baronial opposition to his first cousin, Edward II of England.

Edmund Crouchback 13th-century English prince and nobleman

Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, 1st Earl of Leicester, of Grosmont Castle in Monmouthshire, Wales, a member of the House of Plantagenet, was the second surviving son of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence. In his childhood he had a claim on the Kingdom of Sicily, but he never ruled there. He was granted all the lands of Simon de Montfort in 1265, and from 1267 he was titled Earl of Leicester. In that year he also began to rule Lancashire, but he did not take the title Earl of Lancaster until 1276. Between 1276 and 1284 he governed the counties of Champagne and Brie with his second wife, Blanche of Artois, in the name of her daughter Joan. His nickname, "Crouchback", refers to his participation in the Ninth Crusade.

Edmund Arrowsmith Lancaster Jesuit priest; one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

Saint Edmund Arrowsmith, SJ, is one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales of the Roman Catholic Church. The main source of information on St Edmund is a contemporary account written by an eyewitness and published a short time after his death. This document, conforming to the ancient style of the "Acts of martyrs" includes the story of the execution of another 17th-century Recusant martyr, Richard Herst.

Ambrose Barlow English Benedictine martyr

Ambrose Edward Barlow, O.S.B., was an English Benedictine monk who is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. He is one of a group of saints canonized by Pope Paul VI who became known as the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.

John Southworth (martyr) English martyr

Saint John Southworth was an English Catholic martyr. He is one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.

Blessed John Larke was an English Catholic priest and martyr, who was executed during the reign of Henry VIII. Dr Larke was a notable personal friend of St Thomas More, Lord High Chancellor of England.

Robert Nutter was an English Catholic priest, Dominican friar and martyr. He was beatified in 1987.

John Finch was an English Roman Catholic farmer. He is a Catholic martyr, beatified in 1929.

Thomas Tunstall (Tunstal) was an English Roman Catholic priest. He is a Catholic martyr, beatified in 1929.

John Thulis (Thules) was an English Roman Catholic priest. He is a Catholic martyr, beatified in 1987.

Pendle witches English witch hunt and trial

The trials of the Pendle witches in 1612 are among the most famous witch trials in English history, and some of the best recorded of the 17th century. The twelve accused lived in the area surrounding Pendle Hill in Lancashire, and were charged with the murders of ten people by the use of witchcraft. All but two were tried at Lancaster Assizes on 18–19 August 1612, along with the Samlesbury witches and others, in a series of trials that have become known as the Lancashire witch trials. One was tried at York Assizes on 27 July 1612, and another died in prison. Of the eleven who went to trial – nine women and two men – ten were found guilty and executed by hanging; one was found not guilty.

Richard Herst (Hurst) was an English Roman Catholic recusant layman. He is a Catholic martyr, beatified in 1929.

Samlesbury witches 17th-century English women accused of witchcraft

The Samlesbury witches were three women from the Lancashire village of Samlesbury – Jane Southworth, Jennet Bierley, and Ellen Bierley – accused by a 14-year-old girl, Grace Sowerbutts, of practising witchcraft. Their trial at Lancaster Assizes in England on 19 August 1612 was one in a series of witch trials held there over two days, among the most famous in English history. The trials were unusual for England at that time in two respects: Thomas Potts, the clerk to the court, published the proceedings in his The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster; and the number of the accused found guilty and hanged was unusually high, ten at Lancaster and another at York. All three of the Samlesbury women were acquitted however.

Thomas Gerard, 1st Baron Gerard English landowner and politician

Thomas Gerard, 1st Baron Gerard was a Staffordshire and Lancashire landowner and politician, a member of six English parliaments for three different constituencies. Although a prominent member of the Essex faction in the reign of Elizabeth I, he avoided involvement in the Essex Rebellion and received greater honours, including a peerage, in the reign of James I.

James Bell (priest) English priest

James Bell was an English Catholic priest and the only one of the Marian Priests that is known to have suffered martyrdom.

During the English reformation a number of men were executed at Lancaster in England as a consequence of their Catholic faith. They are commonly referred to as the Lancaster Martyrs and are commemorated locally by the Lancaster Martyrs Memorial Stone which may be found close to the centre of Lancaster city.

Rt Revd Paul Swarbrick is a British Roman Catholic prelate, who has served as Bishop of Lancaster since 2018.

References

    Attribution

    The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

    <i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

    The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".

    Richard Challoner Roman Catholic bishop

    Richard Challoner (1691–1781) was an English Roman Catholic bishop, a leading figure of English Catholicism during the greater part of the 18th century. The titular Bishop of Doberus, he is perhaps most famous for his revision of the Douay–Rheims translation of the Bible.