Thomas Whittaker (rugby league)

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Thomas Whittaker
Personal information
Full nameThomas Whittaker
Bornunknown
Diedunknown
Playing information
Position Forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1903–15 Wigan 291220066

Thomas "Tom" Whittaker (birth unknown – death unknown) was a professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s and 1910s. He played at club level for Wigan, as a forward (prior to the specialist positions of; prop , hooker , second-row , loose forward), during the era of contested scrums. [1]

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Rugby league is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

Wigan Warriors English rugby league club

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Hooker (rugby league)

Hooker is one of the positions in a rugby league football team. Usually wearing jersey number 9, the hooker is one of the team's forwards. During scrums the hooker plays in the front row, and the position's name comes from their role of 'hooking' or 'raking' the ball back with the foot. For this reason the hooker is sometimes referred to as the rake.

Contents

Playing career

Championship Final appearances

Tom Whittaker played as a forward, i.e. number 13, in Wigan's 7-3 victory over Oldham in the Championship Final during 1908–09 season at The Willows, Salford on Saturday 1 May 1909. [2]

Oldham R.L.F.C.

Oldham R.L.F.C., also known as the Roughyeds, is a professional rugby league club in Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. The club currently competes in the Betfred League 1, the third tier of British Rugby League.

The 1908–09 Northern Rugby Football Union season was the 14th season of rugby league football.

The Willows, Salford

The Willows was a rugby league stadium in Weaste, Salford, England. It had a final capacity of 11,363 with 2,500 seats.

County League appearances

Tom Whittaker played in Wigan's victories in the Lancashire County League during the 1908–09 season, 1910–11 season, 1911–12 season, 1912–13 season, 1913–14 season, and 1914–15 season. [3]

The Yorkshire League and the Lancashire League formed two sections of the Rugby Football League Championship for much of its history. Initially, the 22 clubs that broke away in 1895 played in one combined league; however, the following season saw the addition of many clubs, and the League was split into two separate county competitions.

The 1910–11 Northern Rugby Football Union season was the 16th season of rugby league football.

The 1911–12 Northern Rugby Football Union season was the 17th season of rugby league football.

County Cup Final appearances

Tom Whittaker played as a forward, i.e. number 5, in a 15-player team, in Wigan's 0-0 draw with Leigh in the 1905 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1905–06 season at Wheater's Field, Broughton, on Saturday 2 December 1905, [4] played as a forward, i.e. number 11, in the 8-0 victory over Leigh in the 1905 Lancashire County Cup Final replay during the 1905–06 season at Wheater's Field, Broughton, on Monday 11 December 1905, [4] played as a forward, i.e. number 13, in the 10-9 victory over Oldham in the 1908 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1908–09 season at Wheater's Field, Broughton, on Saturday 19 December 1908, [5] played as a forward, i.e. number 10, in the 22-5 victory over Leigh in the 1909 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1909–10 season at Wheater's Field, Broughton, on Saturday 27 November 1909. [6] and played as a forward, i.e. number 13, in the 21-5 victory over Rochdale Hornets in the 1912 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1912–13 season at Weaste, Salford, on Wednesday 11 December 1912. [7]

Leigh Centurions

The Leigh Centurions are a professional rugby league club in Leigh, Greater Manchester, England, who compete in the Championship.

The 1905 Lancashire Cup was the inaugural year for the rugby league Lancashire Cup competition. The cup was won by Wigan who beat Leigh in a replay at Wheater's Field, Broughton, Salford by a score of 8-0.

Historically, English rugby league clubs competed for the Lancashire Cup and the Yorkshire Cup, known collectively as the county cups. The leading rugby clubs in Yorkshire had played in a cup competition for several years prior to the schism of 1895. However, the Lancashire authorities had refused to sanction a similar tournament, fearing it would lead to professionalism.

Notable tour matches

Tom Whittaker played as a forward, i.e. number 9, in Wigan's 10-7 victory over Australia in the 1908–09 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain match at Central Park, Wigan, on Saturday 9 January 1909, [8] and played as a forward, i.e. number 10, in the 16-8 victory over Australia in the 1908–09 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain match at Central Park, Wigan, on Wednesday 20 January 1909. [9]

The Australian national rugby league team have represented Australia in senior men's rugby league football competition since the establishment of the 'Northern Union game' in Australia in 1908. Administered by the Australian Rugby League, the Kangaroos are ranked first in the RLIF World Rankings. The team is the most successful in Rugby League World Cup history, having contested all 15 and winning 11 of them, failing to reach the final only once; the inaugural tournament in 1954. Only four nations have beaten Australia in test matches, and Australia have an overall win percentage of 67%.

1908–09 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain

The 1908–09 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain was the first ever such tour for the newly-formed Australia national rugby league team. The tour was to England and Wales and coincided with the first Wallabies Rugby Union tour of Great Britain, which in hindsight put the Kangaroos in a tough position. The game of rugby league was not yet twelve months old in Australia however a New Zealand side had already toured to Britain, Australia had encountered New Zealand during the 1908 season and the pioneer Australian leaders of the game were keen to match up against the Northern Union founders of the code.

Central Park (Wigan) rugby league stadium in Wigan

Central Park was a rugby league stadium in Wigan, England, which was the home of Wigan RLFC before the club moved to the JJB Stadium in 1999. Its final capacity was 18,000. The site is now a Tesco supermarket car park.

Club career

He made his début for Wigan in the 0-14 defeat by Hunslet F.C. at Parkside, Hunslet on Saturday 5 September 1903, he scored his first try for Wigan in the 15-3 victory over St .Helens at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 7 January 1905, he scored his last try for Wigan in the 18-3 victory over Huddersfield in the 1911 Challenge Cup round-1 match at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 18 February 1911, and he played his last match for Wigan in the 4-15 defeat by Leeds in the Championship play-off semi-final match at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 17 April 1915. During Tom Whittaker's time at Wigan, they also won the South West Lancashire League during the 1904–05 season, and 1905–06 season. [3]

Hunslet F.C. was a professional rugby league club in Hunslet, West Yorkshire, England, which played in the Rugby Football League from 1895 until being dissolved in 1973. Founded in 1883, before the split between rugby league and rugby union, Hunslet were a strong force in the early years of the Northern Rugby Football Union, winning All Four Cups in 1908. New Hunslet was formed and took Hunslet's place for the 1973-74 season.

Parkside was a rugby league stadium in Hunslet, Leeds, England. It was home to Hunslet F.C. rugby league club and the source of their nickname, the Parksiders.

Try way of scoring points in rugby league and rugby union football

A try is a way of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league football. A try is scored by grounding the ball in the opposition's in-goal area. Rugby union and league differ slightly in defining 'grounding the ball' and the 'in-goal' area.

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References

  1. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  2. "1908–1909 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. 1 2 "Statistics at wigan.rlfans.com". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. 1 2 "1905–1906 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. "1908–1909 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. "1909–1910 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. "1912–1913 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. "1909 Tour Match: Wigan 10 Australia 7". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  9. "1909 Tour Match: Wigan 16 Australia 8". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.