Thomas Whyte (academic)

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Thomas Whyte (or White; c.1514 – 12 June 1588) was an English clergyman and academic at the University of Oxford.

Whyte was educated at Winchester College, where he gained a scholarship aged 12 in 1526, [1] and New College, Oxford, holding a fellowship 1532–1553, and graduating B.C.L. 1541, D.C.L. 1553. [2]

Whyte was elected Warden (head) of New College, Oxford, in 1553, a post he held until 1573. [3] He was twice Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University during 1557–8 and 1562–4. [4] [5]

He was Archdeacon of Berkshire from 1557 [6] and Chancellor of Salisbury Cathedral from 1571, holding both offices until his death. [2]

Whyte died on 12 June 1588, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral. [2] [6]

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References

  1. Kirby, T. F. (1888). Winchester Scholars. p. 114. Retrieved 16 March 2022.
  2. 1 2 3 Foster, Joseph. "West-Wicksted". Alumni Oxonienses 1500-1714. British History Online. pp. 1600–1626. Retrieved 16 March 2022.
  3. Salter, H. E.; Lobel, Mary D., eds. (1954). "New College". A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 3: The University of Oxford. Victoria County History. pp. 144–162. Retrieved 25 July 2011.
  4. "Previous Vice-Chancellors". University of Oxford, UK. Retrieved 25 July 2011.
  5. University of Oxford (1888). "Vice-Chancellors". The Historical Register of the University of Oxford. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 21–27. Retrieved 25 July 2011.
  6. 1 2 Horn, Joyce M. (1986), Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1541–1857, vol. 6, pp. 14–16
Academic offices
Preceded by Warden of New College, Oxford
1553–1573
Succeeded by
Preceded by Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University
1557–1558
Succeeded by
Preceded by Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University
1562–1564
Succeeded by
Church of England titles
Preceded by Archdeacon of Berkshire
1557–1588
Succeeded by