Thomas Wilde Boothby

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Thomas Wilde Boothby (9 December 1839 – 19 June 1885), [1] generally known by his full name, or as "T. Wilde Boothby", was a politician in the British colony of South Australia.

Contents

History

Boothby was born the seventh son of Benjamin Boothby (1803–1868) and most likely named for his father's friend and benefactor Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro. [2] He worked as a commission agent and auctioneer.

Benjamin Boothby Australian judge

Benjamin Boothby was a South Australian colonial judge, who was removed from office for misbehaviour, one of four Australian supreme court judges removed in the 19th century.

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro British lawyer, judge and politician

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, was a British lawyer, judge and politician. He was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain between 1850 and 1852.

He and his brother James Henry Boothby took up a lease on a property on the Coorong which they named Tintinara. [3]

Tintinara, South Australia Town in South Australia

Tintinara is a town located in the Murray and Mallee region of the South East of South Australia.

He was a member of the South Australian House of Assembly seat of Victoria from June 1873 to February 1875.

South Australian House of Assembly lower house of the Parliament of South Australia

The House of Assembly, or lower house, is one of the two chambers of the Parliament of South Australia. The other is the Legislative Council. It sits in Parliament House in the state capital, Adelaide.

Victoria was an electorate in the South Australian House of Assembly from 1857 until 1902 and from 1915 to 1993.

He moved from Naracoorte to Strathalbyn around 1873 and to Adelaide in 1874. His wife and two sons left Australia in January 1874. [4] In 1878 he was declared insolvent. [5]

He is perhaps best remembered as father of Guy Boothby (1867–1907) private secretary to Adelaide mayor Lewis Cohen, traveller and author with a significant career in England, and of Ben Boothby (1870– ), artist and companion on Guy's journeys, and also a writer of popular fiction, [6] who completed several of his brother's unfinished stories, [7] and illustrated others. [8] He was by profession a land agent in Bloomsbury, London.

Lewis Cohen (mayor) Australian politician

Sir Lewis Cohen was a businessman who was a Member of the South Australian Parliament for 10 years and served on the Adelaide City Council for 30 years. He was Mayor of Adelaide from 1889–1890, 1901–1904, and 1909–1911, and then Lord Mayor from 1921–1923. He was knighted in 1924.

Bloomsbury area of the London Borough of Camden, in London, England, UK

Bloomsbury is a district in the West End of London, famed as a fashionable residential area and as the home of numerous prestigious cultural, intellectual, and educational institutions. It is bounded by Fitzrovia to the west, Covent Garden to the south, Regent's Park and St. Pancras to the north, and Clerkenwell to the east.

Family

Thomas Wilde Boothby married Mary Agnes Hodding (1843 – 16 July 1907) on 10 March 1864. Their family included:

See also

Related Research Articles

Guy Boothby Australian writer

Guy Newell Boothby was a prolific Australian novelist and writer, noted for sensational fiction in variety magazines around the end of the nineteenth century. He lived mainly in England. He is best known for such works as the Dr Nikola series, about an occultist criminal mastermind who is a Victorian forerunner to Fu Manchu, and Pharos, the Egyptian, a tale of Gothic Egypt, mummies' curses and supernatural revenge. Rudyard Kipling was his friend and mentor, and his books were remembered with affection by George Orwell.

John Price (South Australian politician) Australian politician

John Lloyd (Jack) Price was an Australian politician and trade unionist. He was an Australian Labor Party member of the South Australian House of Assembly for Port Adelaide from 1915 to 1925. He later served in the Australian House of Representatives for Boothby from 1928 until his death in 1941, but left the Labor Party and joined the United Australia Party in the 1931 Labor split over government responses to the Great Depression.

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John Baxter Mather was a Scottish born journalist, newspaper proprietor, landscape painter and art critic in South Australia.

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George John William Stevenson was a lawyer, journalist and politician in the British colony of South Australia.

Henry Allerdale Grainger, generally known as Allerdale Grainger, nicknamed "Ally", was an Australian investor, accountant, editor and polemicist who briefly held a seat in the South Australian Legislative Council. and represented the South Australian House of Assembly multi-member seat of Wallaroo from 1884 to 1885 and from 1890 to 1901, then served as State Agent in London.

John Mitchell Sinclair was a businessman and politician in the colony of South Australia.

The First Waterhouse Ministry was the 7th Ministry of the Government of South Australia, led by George Waterhouse. It commenced on 8 October 1861 as a short-term government solely for the purpose of dealing with an attempt to remove dissident judge Benjamin Boothby. As Henry Strangways refused to serve in the ministry, an Attorney-General was appointed from outside parliament, which the Constitution allowed for a period of up to three months. The ministry resigned following the passage of a motion to remove Boothby, but Waterhouse was successful in gaining support to form an ongoing government, which was sworn in on 17 October as the Second Waterhouse Ministry.

Arthur Lucas Harrold was a businessman and politician in South Australia. He was later jailed for serious financial offences.

Harrold Brothers was a merchant and shipping company in South Australia in the second half of the 19th century, whose principals were brothers Joseph, Daniel and perhaps Henry Harrold, and succeeded by Joseph's sons Arthur, Eyston and Ernest.

The Garrick Club was the name which could apply to several South Australian amateur theatrical groups, perhaps tenuously related, the most successful being the incarnation which operated from 1892 to 1899.

Herbert Dillon Gouge was South Australia's first Government Actuary.

Gabriel Bennett was an auctioneer, stock and cattle salesman and horse breeder in South Australia. He was a founder of the stock and station agents Bennett and Fisher.

William "Bill" Sheppard was a veteran racehorse trainer in the Colony and State of South Australia.

Duncan Campbell Francis Moodie, commonly referred to as D. C. F. Moodie, was a South African writer, historian and linguist who published a newspaper The Portonian in Port Adelaide, South Australia, from 1871 to 1879.

References

  1. "Former Member of Parliament Details – Mr. Thomas Boothby". Parliament of South Australia. Retrieved 1 July 2015.This reference, alone, spells his middle (preferred) name "Wylde".
  2. Greg Taylor. "The Early Life of Mr. Justice Boothby" (PDF). University of Adelaide. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  3. "Personal". The Australasian . Melbourne. 11 December 1920. p. 45. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "XIII.- Appendix. Shipping Intelligence". The South Australian Advertiser . Adelaide. 31 January 1874. p. 7. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "Insolvency Court". South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail . Adelaide. 26 October 1878. p. 10. Retrieved 7 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "Exciting Story". The Evening News . Sydney. 16 April 1907. p. 3. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  7. "Literary Notes". The Register . Adelaide. 16 November 1907. p. 11. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  8. "Personalities". Quiz and the Lantern . Adelaide. 16 January 1896. p. 6. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  9. "Exciting Story". The Evening News . Sydney. 16 April 1907. p. 3. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  10. "Literary Notes". The Register . Adelaide. 16 November 1907. p. 11. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.
  11. "Personalities". Quiz and the Lantern . Adelaide. 16 January 1896. p. 6. Retrieved 2 July 2015 via National Library of Australia.