Thomas Willett

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  1. Bradford.
  2. Bunker.
  3. Bradford (for year 1629), pp. 213–215.
  4. Bradford (for year 1629), pp. 219–220.
  5. State Papers, Colonial, VI: 40, Public Record Office, London; as transcribed in Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society Third. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society. 45 (February 1912): 493–498.
  6. Bradford (for year 1630), pp. 232–233, in his account for the year 1630.
  7. Bradford (for year 1631), p. 246.
  8. Bradford (for year 1635), pp. 275–279.
  9. "Sieur D'Aulney's Letter to Mr. Endecott, Governor". Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Third. Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown. VII: 92–95. 1838.
  10. Philbrick, p. 168.
  11. Shurtleff, I (June 7, 1637): 62.
  12. Shurtleff, II (June 8, 1649): 144–145 and Shurtleff, III (March 5, 1655/6): 95.
  13. Winthrop, pp. 322–323.
  14. Shurtleff, I (January 1, 1633/4): 21.
  15. Shurtleff, I (July 6, 1636): 43.
  16. Shurtleff, I (February 4, 1638/9): 111–112; I (June 1, 1640): 154; and I (November 4, 1640): 166.
  17. Shurtleff, I (August 3, 1640): 159.
  18. Shurtleff, II (March 7, 1647/8): 121.
  19. Shurtleff, II (June 5, 1651): 166.
  20. Shurtleff, III: 249 and IV: 216.
  21. Shurtleff, II (January 23, 1641/2): 31.
  22. Philbrick, pp. 199–200.
  23. Brodhead, John Romeyn (1853). History of the state of New York. New York: Harper & Brothers. I: 525 (footnote).
  24. Philbrick, p. 197.
  25. Baylies, I: 289.
  26. Shurtleff, III and IV.
  27. Shurtleff, IV (June 3, 1662): 18.
  28. Shurtleff, IV (March 5, 1667/8): 175 and V (July 5, 1669): 24.
  29. Shurtleff, IV (March 5, 1667/8): 175
  30. Wright, pp. 41-2.
  31. Bicknell
  32. Pokanoket area, Bicknell, p. 124.
  33. Martin, pp. 70 and 80. (restricted access available online)
  34. Shurleff (March 1, 1658/9): III: 157.
  35. Burgess, p. 162.
  36. Connecticut historical survey map
  37. Burgess, p. 163.
  38. Burgess, p. 163.
  39. Burrows and Wallace, p. 78.
  40. Brodhead, John Romeyn (1871). History of the state of New York. New York: Harper & Brothers. II: 144.
  41. Philbrick, pp. 197, 213–214, and 315–316.
  42. Philbrick, pp. 200–206.
  43. Shurtleff, IV (April 2, 1667): 145.
  44. Wright, pp. 47–51.
  45. Shurtleff, IV (October 30, 1667), p. 169.
  46. Wright, p. 3.
  47. Jones, John (August 1880). "John Myles and his Times". Baptist Quarterly Review. New York: The Boston Review Association. X (January 1888): 43-6.
  48. Shurtleff, IV (July 2, 1667): 162.
  49. Wright, pp. 47-9.
  50. Shurtleff, IV (July 2, 1667): 162.
  51. Bishop, George (1703). New England Judged. London: T. Sowle. I, 136.
  52. Prudden, Lillian Eliza (1901). Peter Prudden: a story of his life and New Haven and Milford, Conn. New Haven, Conn.: Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor. p. 56.
  53. Shurtleff, V (December 17, 1673): 136.
  54. Burrows and Wallace, pp. 82–83.
  55. THE INVENTORY OF THOMAS WILLETT. The Plymouth Colony Archive Project.
  56. Burgess, p. 164.
  57. Shurtleff, V (November 1, 1676): 216.
  58. Burgess, p. 159.
  59. Stephen, Leslie, Sir (1900–5). "Willett, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. New York: Macmillan. LXI: 292.
  60. "The Willet Family". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Boston: Samuel G. Drake. II (October 1848): 376. 1848.
  61. Dexter, p. 639.
  62. Burgess, pp. 158–159.
  63. Banks, Charles Edward (1930). Planters of the Commonwealth. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. pp. 99–100.
  64. Drake, Samuel Gardner (1860). Result of some researches among the British archives for information relative to the founders of New England. Boston: Office of the New Eng. Hist. and Gen. Register. p. 12.
  65. State Papers, Colonial, VI: 40, Public Record Office, London; as transcribed in Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society Third. Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society. 45 (February 1912): 493–498.
  66. Brown, George Tilden (1919). John Browne, Gentleman of Plymouth. Providence: Remington Press.
  67. Brown, p. 19.
  68. Saffin, John. Personal Manuscript. (As reported by Abner C. Goodell Jr.), Colonial Society of Massachusetts I: Transactions (1892–1894), (April 1894), (58): 358–360.
  69. "The Willet Family". New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Boston: Samuel G. Drake. II (October 1848): 376. 1848.
  70. Brown, pp. 27–28.
  71. Find a Grave Memorial: Mary Willett
  72. Austin, p. 428
  73. New England Historical & Genealogical Register. 89 (April 1935): 151.
  74. Find a Grave Memorial: Esther Flint
  75. Find a Grave Memorial: Andrew Willett
  76. Burgess, p. 159 (Will of Thomas Willett).
  77. Stephen, Leslie, Sir (1900–5). "Willett, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. New York: Macmillan. LXI: 292.
  78. Burgess, p. 159 (Will of Thomas Willett).
  79. Bradford (for year 1608), pp. 11–15.
  80. Bunker, pp. 188–201.
  81. Find a Grave Memorial: Thomas Willett Sr.
  82. Burgess, p. 159.
  83. Dexter, p. 639.
  84. Burgess, pp. 158–159.
  85. Brown, p. 26.
  86. Brown, p. 26.
  87. Shurtleff, I (July 6, 1636): 43.
  88. Brown, p. 22.
  89. Prudden, Lillian Eliza (1901). Peter Prudden: a story of his life and New Haven and Milford, Conn. New Haven, Conn.: Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor. p. 56.
  90. Prudden, Lillian Eliza (1901). Peter Prudden: a story of his life and New Haven and Milford, Conn. New Haven, Conn.: Tuttle, Morehouse and Taylor. p. 58.
  91. Find a Grave Memorials: Joanna Boyse Bishop.
  92. Hooker, Edward, and Margaret Huntington Hooker (ed.) (1908). The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, 1586–1908. Rochester, N.Y.: Margaret Huntington Hooker. pp. 10–12, 18–19, and 22–23.
  93. Reynolds, Cuyler (ed.) (1911). Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs. New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company. I: 254–255.
  94. Burrows and Wallace, p. 101.
  95. Hillman, E. Haviland. "Ancestry of Colonel Marius Willett". The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. XLVII (April 1916): 120.
  96. The Willets family of Long Island
  97. Willett Family of Long Island
  98. Philbrick, pp. 315–316.
  99. Shurtleff, V (November 1, 1676): 216.
  100. Brown, pp. 27–28.
  101. Austin, p. 428.
  102. Martin, pp. 68–70, 80–81.
  103. Austin, p. 428.
  104. Stephen, Leslie, Sir (1900–5). "Willett, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. New York: Macmillan. LXI: 292.
  105. Hillman, E. Haviland. "Ancestry of Colonel Marius Willett". The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. XLVII (April 1916): 119–123.
  106. Stephen, Leslie, Sir (1900–5). "Willett, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. New York: Macmillan. LXI: 292.
  107. Clarence E. Meek (July 1954). "Fireboats Through The Years" . Retrieved January 25, 2020.

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References

Thomas Willett
1st and 3rd Mayor of New York City
In office
June 1665 June 1666
New title Mayor of New York City
1665–1666
Succeeded by
Preceded by Mayor of New York City
1667–1668
Succeeded by