Thomas William Taylor

Last updated

Thomas William Taylor (September 6, 1852 February 24, 1924) [1] was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served as the 13th Mayor of Winnipeg, and was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1900 to 1914. Taylor was a member of the Conservative Party.

Manitoba Province of Canada

Manitoba is a province at the longitudinal centre of Canada. It is often considered one of the three prairie provinces and is Canada's fifth-most populous province with its estimated 1.3 million people. Manitoba covers 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi) with a widely varied landscape, stretching from the northern oceanic coastline to the southern border with the United States. The province is bordered by the provinces of Ontario to the east and Saskatchewan to the west, the territories of Nunavut to the north, and Northwest Territories to the northwest, and the U.S. states of North Dakota and Minnesota to the south.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Legislative Assembly of Manitoba form the Legislature of Manitoba, Canada

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba and the Queen of Canada in Right of Manitoba, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba form the legislature of the Canadian province of Manitoba. Fifty-seven members are elected to this assembly in provincial general elections, all in single-member constituencies with first-past-the-post voting. The Manitoba Legislative Building is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge constituencies.

Taylor was born in Portsmouth, England, and was educated in London, Ontario. He came to Winnipeg in 1877 and set up a bookbinding business two years letter. Taylor served as a Winnipeg alderman in 1892, was elected mayor 1893, and was re-elected without opposition in 1894. He was also the president of the Manitoba Rifle Association, and of the St. Andrew's Society. In religion, he was a member of the Church of England.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

London, Ontario City in Ontario, Canada

London is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada along the Quebec City–Windsor Corridor. The city had a population of 383,822 according to the 2016 Canadian census. London is at the confluence of the Thames River, approximately 200 km (120 mi) from both Toronto, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan; and about 230 km (140 mi) from Buffalo, New York. The city of London is a separated municipality, politically separate from Middlesex County, though it remains the county seat.

Ontario Province of Canada

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for 38.3 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto, which is also Ontario's provincial capital.

Taylor first ran for the Manitoba legislature in the 1896 provincial election, and lost to Liberal Peter McIntyre by 238 votes in Winnipeg North. He was first elected to the legislature in a by-election, held for Winnipeg Centre on November 1, 1900. Taylor defeated Liberal candidate Robert Muir by 157 votes, and served in the legislature as a backbench supporter of Rodmond Roblin's administration. He was re-elected in the riding of Winnipeg Centre over the Liberal candidate, J.A. McArthur, in the elections of 1903 and 1907.

Manitoba Liberal Party centrist political party in Manitoba, Canada

The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, following the province's creation in 1870.

Peter McIntyre (Manitoba politician) Canadian politician

Peter Campbell McIntyre was a printer and political figure in Manitoba. He represented Winnipeg North from 1892 to 1899 in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba as a Liberal.

He was returned to the legislature again in the 1910 election, under controversial circumstances. Taylor defeated Fred Dixon, a Labour candidate supported by the Liberal Party, by a margin of seventy-three votes. The Socialist Party also ran a candidate in Winnipeg Centre, who received ninety-nine votes. Some believe the Conservatives encouraged the Socialist campaign to ensure their own victory.

Frederick John "Fred" Dixon was a Manitoba politician, and was for several years the dominant figure in the province's mainstream labour and Georgist movements.

The Manitoba Labour Party (MLP) was a reformist, non-Marxist labour party in Manitoba, Canada. It was created in early May 1910 as a successor to the province's second Independent Labour Party (1906–08). Former Member of Parliament Arthur Puttee was a leading MLP organizer. The party fielded one candidate in the 1910 provincial election, and also ran candidates at the municipal level.

Despite his municipal experience, Taylor was never appointed to cabinet. He did not seek re-election in 1914, and died ten years later.

Taylor's son-in-law, W.C. Birt, took over the family's bookbinding business after Taylor's death. The Thomas William Taylor printing plant and book bindery remained open in Winnipeg until 1968.

Taylor Avenue in Winnipeg is named for Thomas William Taylor. [2]

Related Research Articles

There have been various groups in Canada that have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. These were usually local or provincial groups using the Labour Party or Independent Labour Party name, backed by local Labour Councils or individual trade unions. There was an attempt to create a national Canadian Labour Party in the late 1910s and in the 1920s, but these were partly successful. The Communist Party of Canada, formed in 1921/22, fulfilled some of labour's political yearnings from coast to coast, and then the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation - Worker Farmer Socialist" was formed in 1932. With organic ties to the organized labour movement, this was a labour party by definition.

Richard Gardiner Willis was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He was the leader of the Manitoba Conservative Party from 1919 to 1922, and served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1922 until his death.

The Socialist Party of Manitoba (SPM) was a short-lived social democratic political party launched in 1902 in the Canadian province of Manitoba. The organisation advanced a moderate programme of social reform legislation. In 1904 the SPM became one of the constituent units founding the Socialist Party of Canada, an organisation which continued until 1925.

Fawcett Gowler Taylor, was a Manitoba politician, and was the leader of that province's Conservative Party from 1922 to 1933.

Francis Evans Cornish Canadian politician

Francis Evans Cornish was a Canadian politician. He served as Mayor of London, Canada West, in the early 1860s, became the first Mayor of Winnipeg in 1874, and was for a time a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba.

James Cowan was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1958 to 1969.

Skuli Sigfusson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba on three occasions: from 1915 to 1920, 1922 to 1936, and 1941 to 1945.

Joseph Bernier Canadian politician

Joseph Bernier was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba on four occasions between 1900 and 1932. Bernier was a member of the Conservative Party, and served as a cabinet minister in the government of Rodmond Roblin. His father, Thomas A. Bernier, was a member of the Senate of Canada.

Joseph Hamelin was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1927. Hamelin's paternal grandfather, Salomon Hamelin, served in the Legislative Council of Manitoba from 1871 to 1876. His maternal grandfather was legislator Pascal Breland.

George Allison Grierson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1922, and was a cabinet minister in the government of Tobias Norris. Grierson was a member of the Liberal Party.

Arthur John Lobb was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1915 to 1920, as a member of the Liberal Party.

William Henry Sims was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1920 as a member of the Liberal Party.

James Henry Howden was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba as a member of the Conservative Party from 1903 to 1915, and was a cabinet minister in the government of Rodmond Roblin.

Thomas Boniface Molloy was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1915, as a member of the Liberal Party.

Edmund L. Taylor Canadian politician

Edmund Landor Taylor was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1913 to 1915, as a member of the Conservative Party.

John Henry McConnell was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1922, as a member of the Liberal Party.

Colin H. Campbell Canadian politician

Colin H. Campbell was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba as a Conservative from 1899 to 1914, and was a cabinet minister in the governments of Hugh John Macdonald and Rodmond Roblin.

John W. Thompson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1910 to 1914, as a member of the Liberal Party.

Winnipeg Centre was a provincial electoral division in Manitoba, Canada. It existed on three separate occasions.

The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba ran 38 candidates in the 1953 provincial election, under the leadership of Errick Willis. Twelve of these candidates were elected, and the Progressive Conservatives formed the official opposition in the legislature. Some candidates have their own biography pages; information about others may be founded here.

References

  1. Thomas William Taylor. Manitoba Historical Society. Accessed November 27, 2011.
  2. History in Winnipeg Street Names. Manitoba Historical Society. Accessed November 25, 2011.