Thomas Williams (Kennington MP)

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Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Samuel Beauchamp Williams (1877 – 7 July 1927) [1] was a British physician of the Indian Medical Service, and a Labour Party politician. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for the Kennington division of Lambeth from 1923 to 1924. [1]

Indian Medical Service military medical service in British India

The Indian Medical Service (IMS) was a military medical service in British India, which also had some civilian functions. It served during the two World Wars, and remained in existence until the independence of India in 1947. Many of its officers, who were both British and Indian, served in civilian hospitals.

The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom that has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights.

Kennington (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-1950

Kennington was a borough constituency centred on the Kennington district of South London. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Biography

He was born in 1877.

In 1902 he passed out from the Army Medical School, Punjab, and gained the rank of Lieutenant in the Indian Medical Service. He reached the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, a brevet promotion in the Indian Medical Service in 1917, [2] serving through the First World War. In 1922 he criticised the hospitals policy of the British Medical Association from the Labour Party point of view. [3]

The British Medical Association (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. The association does not regulate or certify doctors, a responsibility which lies with the General Medical Council. The association's headquarters are located in BMA House, Tavistock Square, London. Additionally, the association has national offices in Cardiff, Belfast, and Edinburgh, a European office in Brussels and a number of offices in English regions. The BMA has a range of representative and scientific committees and is recognised by National Health Service (NHS) employers as sole contract negotiators for doctors.

Williams first stood for Parliament at the 1922 general election in Bridgwater division of Somerset, where came a poor third with only 6.7% of the votes. [4] At the 1923 general election he stood in Kennington, a Conservative-held seat which he won [5] with a majority of 2.4% of the votes. [6] However, he was defeated at the next general, election in October 1924 by the Conservative candidate George Harvey, [6] and polled a poor third at the June 1925 by-election in Eastbourne, [7] after which he did not stand again.

Parliament of the United Kingdom Supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known internationally as the UK Parliament, British Parliament, or Westminster Parliament, and domestically simply as Parliament or Westminster, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and the British Overseas Territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate power over all other political bodies in the UK and the overseas territories. Parliament is bicameral but has three parts, consisting of the Sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons. The two houses meet in the Palace of Westminster in the City of Westminster, one of the inner boroughs of the capital city, London.

1922 United Kingdom general election

The 1922 United Kingdom general election was held on Wednesday 15 November 1922. It was the first general election held after most of Ireland left the United Kingdom to form the Irish Free State, and was won by the Conservatives led by Bonar Law, who gained an overall majority over Labour, led by J. R. Clynes, and a divided Liberal Party.

Bridgwater (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-2010

Bridgwater was a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, until 2010 when it was replaced by the Bridgwater and West Somerset constituency. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

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References

  1. 1 2 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "K" (part 1)
  2. http://www.edinburgh-gazette.co.uk/issues/13135/pages/1848/page.pdf
  3. "Supplement 942". British Medical Journal. 1 (3206): S221–S228. 1922. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.3206.s221. PMC   2416320 .
  4. Craig, F. W. S. (1983) [1969]. British parliamentary election results 1918–1949 (3rd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 454. ISBN   0-900178-06-X.
  5. "No. 32897". The London Gazette . 11 January 1924. p. 362.
  6. 1 2 Craig, page 34
  7. Craig, page 480

Further reading

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Francis Capel Harrison
Member of Parliament for Kennington
19231924
Succeeded by
George Harvey