Thomas Willoughby, 11th Baron Willoughby of Parham

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Descendants of Sir Thomas Willoughby and Mary Thornhaugh Lord-willoughby-chart.GIF
Descendants of Sir Thomas Willoughby and Mary Thornhaugh

Thomas Willoughby, 11th Baron Willoughby of Parham (c.1602–1691/92) was an English peer of the House of Lords. [1] He was born in about 1602, son of Sir Thomas Willoughby and Mary Thornhaugh (Thornley), and grandson of Charles Willoughby, 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham and Lady Margaret Clinton. [2]

The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain.

House of Lords Upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers and domestically usually referred to simply as the Lords, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Charles Willoughby, 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham Peer in House of Lords

Charles Willoughby, 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham was the only son of William Willoughby, 1st Baron Willoughby of Parham, and Elizabeth Heneage.

Contents

Family

He married Eleanor Whittle, daughter of Hugh and Mary Whittle, of Horwich on 22 February 1639 (or 1640). [3] After marriage they lived at Old Lord's Farm in Horwich, the area is still known as 'Old Lords Estate'. [4] [5] They had two sons and three daughters, Hugh, the eldest son and Francis who in 1696 married Eleanor Rothwell of Haigh. Their daughters were Mary who married Samuel Greenhalgh of Adlington, Sarah and Abigail. [5] [6] Eleanor died aged 67 in 1665.

Horwich town and civil parish in Greater Manchester

Horwich is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton, Greater Manchester, England. Historically in Lancashire, it is 5.3 miles (8.5 km) southeast of Chorley, 5.8 miles (9.3 km) northwest of Bolton and 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Manchester. It lies at the southern edge of the West Pennine Moors with the M61 motorway passing close to the south and west. At the 2011 Census, Horwich had a population of 20,067.

Haigh, Greater Manchester village and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan in Greater Manchester, England

Haigh is a village and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan in Greater Manchester, England. Historically a part of Lancashire, it is located next to the village of Aspull. The western boundary is the River Douglas which separates the township from Wigan. To the north a small brook running into the Douglas divides it from Blackrod. At the 2001 census it had a population of 594.

Adlington, Lancashire town and civil parish in Lancashire, England, UK

Adlington is a small town and civil parish in Lancashire, England, near the West Pennine Moors and the town of Chorley. Six miles northwest of Bolton, it became a separate parish in 1842 then grew into a town around the textile industry. It had a population of 5,270 at the 2001 census, but in the last decade this has risen by over 2,000 more people to 7,326. The measured population at the 2011 Census was 6,010.

Military and Civic Life

Thomas was a staunch puritan and is closely associated with dissenting religious bodies. [4] During the English Civil War, he was a major and fought on the side of the Parliamentarians. [5] He saw action in the first and second battles at Middlewich in 1643, and at the Bolton Massacre in 1644. [5]

English Civil War Civil war in England (1642–1651)

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of civil wars and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") principally over the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Major is a military rank of commissioned officer status, with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces throughout the world.

Roundhead Name given to the supporters of the Parliament during the English Civil War

Roundheads were the supporters of the Parliament of England during the English Civil War (1641–1652). Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against King Charles I of England and his supporters, known as the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the principle of the 'divine right of kings'. The goal of the Roundhead party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration of the country/kingdom.

School Governor

He was a governor of Rivington Grammar School during the Commonwealth and after Restoration from 1650 until 1691. The school lacked income between 1650 and 1660 so Thomas travelled to London, York and Durham for affidavits and trials and secured the rental income for the school. [7] In the school's records he is noted as Gentleman of Horwich. He served as Chairman of Governors in 1651, 1653–54, 1653, 1670, 1676 and 1683. [8]

Rivington and Blackrod High School Academy, formally a voluntary controlled comprehensive academy in Greater Manchester, England

Rivington and Blackrod High School is a Church of England, voluntary controlled comprehensive and sixth form school in the North West region of England. The school is located at two sites, with the upper school situated on Rivington Lane in Rivington, Lancashire, and the lower school situated on Albert Street in Horwich, Greater Manchester.

Gentleman any man of good, courteous conduct

In modern parlance, a gentleman is any man of good, courteous conduct. Originally, a gentleman was a man of the lowest rank of the English gentry, standing below an esquire and above a yeoman. By definition, this category included the younger sons of the younger sons of peers and the younger sons of baronets, knights, and esquires in perpetual succession, and thus the term captures the common denominator of gentility shared by both constituents of the English aristocracy: the peerage and the gentry. In this sense, gentleman corresponds to the French gentilhomme ("nobleman"), which in Great Britain, has long meant only the peerage. In this context, Maurice Keen points to the category of "gentlemen" as thus constituting "the nearest contemporary English equivalent of the noblesse of France". The notion of "gentlemen" as encapsulating the members of the hereditary ruling class was what the rebels under John Ball in the 14th century meant when they repeated:

When Adam delved and Eve span,
Who was then the gentleman?

Succession

Thomas was called to parliament by writ 19 May 1685 [2] subsequent to there being no other heir known at the time of the death of his cousin, Charles Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby of Parham in 1679. He was called to parliament as the 11th Baron Willoughby of Parham 1547 creation, however the writ had created a new Barony and with it a new title of 1st Baron willoughy of Parham (1685 creation). [9]

Charles Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby of Parham was an English peer of the House of Lords.

Baron Willoughby of Parham

Baron Willoughby of Parham was a title in the Peerage of England with two creations. The first creation was for Sir William Willoughby who was raised to the peerage under letters patent in 1547, with the remainder to his heirs male of body. The second creation was by writ in 1679, without the restriction on inheritance by gender. The creation of the barony gave right to an hereditary peerage and seat in the House of Lords, the upper house of Parliament.

The title would have been inherited by Henry Willoughby, grandson of Sir Ambrose Willoughby, and great-grandson of Charles, the 2nd Baron. [2] However, Henry Willoughby had emigrated to Virginia and his whereabouts was not known. [2] The right to the first barony created by letters patent in 1547 was later claimed by a descendant of Henry Willoughby as 16th Baron Willoughby of Parham in 1767. [10] [9]

Virginia State in the United States

Virginia, officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2018 is over 8.5 million.

Letters patent type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order

Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order issued by a monarch, president, or other head of state, generally granting an office, right, monopoly, title, or status to a person or corporation. Letters patent can be used for the creation of corporations or government offices, or for the granting of city status or a coat of arms. Letters patent are issued for the appointment of representatives of the Crown, such as governors and governors-general of Commonwealth realms, as well as appointing a Royal Commission. In the United Kingdom they are also issued for the creation of peers of the realm. A particular form of letters patent has evolved into the modern patent granting exclusive rights in an invention. In this case it is essential that the written grant should be in the form of a public document so other inventors can consult it to avoid infringement and also to understand how to "practice" the invention, i.e., put it into practical use. In the Holy Roman Empire, Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary, imperial patent was also the highest form of generally binding legal regulations, e. g. Patent of Toleration, Serfdom Patent etc.

Henry Willoughby, 16th Baron Willoughby of Parham was an English peer of the House of Lords.

Death

Thomas died in 1691 aged 89 and was buried under the chancel by the east window at the old Horwich Parish Church. [4] Thomas was succeeded by his eldest son Hugh as the 12th Baron Willoughby of Parham, 2nd Baron of the 1685 creation. [2] [5]

Notes

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Edward Willoughby, 13th Baron Willoughby of Parham (1676–1713) was an English peer of the House of Lords. He was the son of Francis Willoughby (1676–1704) and Eleanor, daughter of Thomas Rothwell of Haigh. Francis was the younger brother of Hugh Willoughby, 12th Baron Willoughby of Parham who died without a male heir. Edward Willoughby was in military service with the Duke of Marlborough's regiment in Flanders when he died, unmarried, aged 37 in 1713. The administration of his estate was granted to a creditor, his mother and brother having renounced.

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John Willoughby, 8th Baron Willoughby of Parham (1669–1678) was an English peer of the House of Lords.

John Willoughby, 9th Baron Willoughby of Parham (1643–1678) was an English peer of the House of Lords.

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Thomas Hampson was an English author and local historian.

References

  1. Burke 1831 , p. 576
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Burke 1831 , p. 577
  3. Willoughby Monument, Illustrated Charts by C.J Ward, 1998 Rivington Unitarian Chapel
  4. 1 2 3 Shaw 1940 , pp. 276
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Smith 1989 , p. 194
  6. Shaw 1940 , pp. 277
  7. Kay 1966 , p. 77
  8. Kay 1966 , pp. 191–192
  9. 1 2 Hampson 1893, p. 70.
  10. Shaw 1940 , pp. 280

Bibliography

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Willoughby
Baron Willoughby of Parham
1679–1692
Succeeded by
Hugh Willoughby