Thomas Willoughby, 4th Baron Middleton

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Thomas Willoughby, 4th Baron Middleton (19 December 1728 – 2 November 1781), was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1762 to 1774, when he succeeded to the peerage as Baron Middleton.

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

A peerage is a legal system historically comprising various hereditary titles in a number of countries, and composed of assorted noble ranks.

Baron Middleton title in the peerage of England since 1711, held by the Willoughby family

Baron Middleton, of Middleton in the County of Warwick, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for Sir Thomas Willoughby, 2nd Baronet, who had previously represented Nottinghamshire and Newark in Parliament. The Willoughby Baronetcy, of Wollaton in the County of Nottingham, had been created in the Baronetage of England in 1677 for his elder brother Francis Willoughby, with special remainder to the latter's only brother Thomas, who succeeded him in 1688. Lord Middleton was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Nottinghamshire and Tamworth. On the death of his younger son, the fourth Baron, the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. He was succeeded by his cousin Henry Middleton, the fifth Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Thomas Willoughby, second son of the first Baron. On the death of his son, the sixth Baron, this line of the family also failed.

Wollaton Hall, Nottingham Wollaton Hall Nov2010.jpg
Wollaton Hall, Nottingham

Willoughby was the second son of Francis Willoughby, 2nd Baron Middleton. [1] He was educated at Bury St Edmund's School, and entered Jesus College, Cambridge, in 1745. [2]

Francis Willoughby, 2nd Baron Middleton British politician

Francis Willoughby, 2nd Baron Middleton was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1713 to 1727. He succeeded to a barony in the Peerage of Great Britain.

Jesus College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England

Jesus College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge. Its common name comes from the name of its chapel, Jesus Chapel.

Willoughby was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Nottinghamshire at a by-election on 13 December 1762. He was returned unopposed again at the general elections of 1768 and 1774.

Nottinghamshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs), traditionally known as Knights of the Shire.

1768 British general election

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1774 British general election

The 1774 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 14th Parliament of Great Britain to be held, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Lord North's government was returned with a large majority. The opposition consisted of factions supporting the Marquess of Rockingham and the Earl of Chatham, both of whom referred to themselves as Whigs. North's opponents referred to his supporters as Tories, but no Tory party existed at the time and his supporters rejected the label.

When his brother died on 16 December 1774 he succeeded to the Barony and was called to the House of Lords. [3]

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

He married Georgina, daughter of Evelyn Chadwick of West Leake, Nottinghamshire, in 1770 and lived in the family seat at Wollaton Park, Nottinghamshire. They had no children [4] and was succeeded in the barony and estates by his cousin, Henry Willoughby, 5th Baron Middleton.

Wollaton Park deer park and collection of historic buildings and museums in Nottingham, England

Wollaton Park is a deer park and home of Wollaton Hall, Nottingham Natural History Museum and Nottingham Industrial Museum in the heart of Nottingham, England.

Henry Willoughby, 5th Baron Middleton British baron

Henry Willoughby, 5th Baron Middleton was an English nobleman, the son of Hon. Thomas Willoughby.

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References

  1. "4th Baron Middleton Bio" . Retrieved 2 November 2009.
  2. "Willoughby, Thomas (WLHY745T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  3. "WILLOUGHBY, Hon. Thomas (1728-81), of West Leake, Notts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  4. "Willoughby pedigree 3" . Retrieved 3 January 2006.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Lord Robert Manners-Sutton
John Thornhagh
Member of Parliament for Nottinghamshire
1762–1774
With: John Thornhagh 1762–1774
Earl of Lincoln 1774
Succeeded by
Earl of Lincoln
Lord Edward Bentinck
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Lord Middleton
High Steward of Sutton Coldfield
1774–1781
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Bath
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Francis Willoughby
Baron Middleton
1774–1781
Succeeded by
Henry Willoughby