Thomas Willoughby (MP)

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Thomas Willoughby (11 June 1694 – 2 December 1742) was an English landowner and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1720 to 1734.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Birdsall House Birdsall House - geograph.org.uk - 573986.jpg
Birdsall House

Willoughby was the second son of Thomas Willoughby, 1st Baron Middleton and his wife Elizabeth Rothwell, daughter of Sir Richard Rothwell, 1st Baronet, MP. He was educated at Eton College and was admitted at Jesus College, Cambridge on 1 November 1711. He matriculated there in 1712 and was awarded MA in 1720. [1] In 1719, he married Elizabeth Sotheby, the daughter and heiress of Thomas Sotheby of Birdsall of Birdsall, North Yorkshire. Through his marriage, he inherited Birdsall House [2]

Thomas Willoughby, 1st Baron Middleton, was a Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1698 and 1711 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Middleton.

Sir Richard Rothwell, 1st Baronet of Stapleford, Lincolnshire was an English Member of Parliament between 1677 and 1681.

Eton College school in Windsor and Maidenhead, UK

Eton College is a 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire, England. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as Kynge's College of Our Ladye of Eton besyde Windesore , as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school. Eton's history and influence have made Eton one of the most prestigious schools in the world.

Willoughby was elected Tory Member of Parliament for Cambridge University at a by-election on 19 December 1720. He was returned unopposed again for the university at the 1722 general election. At the 1727 general election, Willoughby stood for Parliament at Tamworth on his father's interest and was elected MP. There is little record of his activities in Parliament and he did not stand in 1734. [3]

Cambridge University was a university constituency electing two members to the British House of Commons, from 1603 to 1950.

1722 British general election

The 1722 British general election elected members to serve in the House of Commons of the 6th Parliament of Great Britain. This was the fifth such election since the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Thanks to the Septennial Act of 1715, which swept away the maximum three-year life of a parliament created by the Meeting of Parliament Act 1694, it followed some seven years after the previous election, that of 1715.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

Willoughby died on 2 December 1742 and his wife ten years later on 25 April 1752. They had seven children:

Henry Willoughby, 5th Baron Middleton British baron

Henry Willoughby, 5th Baron Middleton was an English nobleman, the son of Hon. Thomas Willoughby.

Birdsall House became the chief residence of the Barons Middleton in 1923. [2]

Baron Middleton title in the peerage of England since 1711, held by the Willoughby family

Baron Middleton, of Middleton in the County of Warwick, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1711 for Sir Thomas Willoughby, 2nd Baronet, who had previously represented Nottinghamshire and Newark in Parliament. The Willoughby Baronetcy, of Wollaton in the County of Nottingham, had been created in the Baronetage of England in 1677, for his elder brother Francis Willoughby, with special remainder to the latter's only brother Thomas, who succeeded him in 1688. Lord Middleton was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baron. He sat as Member of Parliament for Nottinghamshire and Tamworth. On the death of his younger son, the fourth Baron, the line of the eldest son of the first Baron failed. He was succeeded by his cousin Henry Middleton, the fifth Baron. He was the son of the Hon. Thomas Willoughby, second son of the first Baron. On the death of his son, the sixth Baron, this line of the family also failed.

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References

  1. "Willoughby, Thomas (WLHY711T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. 1 2 "The Willoughby Family of Wollaton and Middleton" . Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  3. "WILLOUGHBY, Hon. Thomas (1694-1742), of Birdsall, Yorks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Dixie Windsor
Thomas Paske
Member of Parliament for Cambridge University
1720–1727
With: Dixie Windsor
Succeeded by
Edward Finch
Thomas Townshend
Preceded by
Francis Willoughby
George Compton
Member of Parliament for Tamworth
1727–1734
With: The Earl of Inchiquin
Succeeded by
Lord John Sackville
George Compton