Thomas Willoughby Newton

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Thomas Willoughby Newton (18 January 1804 – 22 September 1853) was a Whig member of the United States House of Representatives from the State of Arkansas.

United States House of Representatives Lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Arkansas U.S. state in the United States

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is from the Osage language, of Siouan derivation; it denoted their related kin, the Quapaw people. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Thomas was born in Alexandria, Virginia on 18 January 1804. Newton attended public schools in Virginia. He moved to Little Rock, Arkansas in 1820. In 1825 he became clerk of the court of Pulaski County, Arkansas and served for four years. In 1829 he moved to Shelby County, Kentucky where he remained for eight years. He returned to Little Rock in 1837 and began working in a bank as a cashier.

Alexandria, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 139,966, and in 2018, the population was estimated to be 160,530. Located along the western bank of the Potomac River, Alexandria is approximately 7 miles (11 km) south of downtown Washington, D.C.

Little Rock, Arkansas Capital of Arkansas

Little Rock is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Arkansas. As the county seat of Pulaski County, the city was incorporated on November 7, 1831, on the south bank of the Arkansas River close to the state's geographic center. The city derives its name from a rock formation along the river, named the "Little Rock" by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe in the 1720s. The capital of the Arkansas Territory was moved to Little Rock from Arkansas Post in 1821. The city's population was 197,881 in 2018 according to the United States Census Bureau. The six-county Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, AR Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked 78th in terms of population in the United States with 738,344 residents according to the 2017 estimate by the United States Census Bureau.

Pulaski County, Arkansas U.S. county in Arkansas

Pulaski County is a county in the U.S. state of Arkansas with a population of 392,664, making it the most populous county in Arkansas. Its county seat is Little Rock, which is also Arkansas's capital and largest city. Pulaski County is Arkansas's fifth county, formed on December 15, 1818, alongside Clark and Hempstead Counties. The county is named for Casimir Pulaski, a Polish volunteer who saved George Washington's life during the American Revolutionary War.

In 1844 he ran for a seat in the Arkansas State Senate and was elected as a Whig. He served four years in the Senate. Newton was elected to fill the vacant seat in Congress after Archibald Yell resigned in 1847 to join the Army for the Mexican–American War. This election made Newton the only person ever elected to the U.S. House from Arkansas as a Whig. Newton served in Washington for only a month, and declined to run for a full term.

Archibald Yell 2nd governor of Arkansas (1840 to 1844)

Archibald Yell was an American politician who served as the U.S. Representative from Arkansas from 1836 to 1839, and 1845 to 1846. He was the second Governor of Arkansas, serving from 1840 to 1844. Yell was killed in action at the Battle of Buena Vista on February 23, 1847.

Mexican–American War Armed conflict between the United States of America and Mexico from 1846 to 1848

The Mexican–American War, also known in the United States as the Mexican War and in Mexico as the Intervención Estadounidense en México, was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. It followed in the wake of the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which was not formally recognized by the Mexican government, who disputed the Treaties of Velasco signed by Mexican caudillo President/General Antonio López de Santa Anna after the Texas Revolution a decade earlier. In 1845, newly elected U.S. President James K. Polk, who saw the annexation of Texas as the first step towards a further expansion of the United States, sent troops to the disputed area and a diplomatic mission to Mexico. After Mexican forces attacked U.S. forces, the United States Congress declared war.

Thomas Willoughby Newton died in New York City on 22 September 1853, aged 49, and is buried in the historic Mount Holly Cemetery in Little Rock. Newton County, Arkansas was named in his honor.

Mount Holly Cemetery United States historic place

Mount Holly Cemetery is a historic cemetery located in the Quapaw Quarter area of downtown Little Rock in the U.S. state of Arkansas, and is the burial place for numerous Arkansans of note. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970 and has been nicknamed "The Westminster Abbey of Arkansas".

Newton County, Arkansas U.S. county in Arkansas

Newton County is a county in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,330. The county seat is Jasper. Newton County is Arkansas's 46th county, formed on December 14, 1842, and named for Thomas W. Newton, an Arkansas Congressman. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Archibald Yell
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas's at-large congressional district

February 6, 1847 – March 3, 1847
Succeeded by
Robert W. Johnson

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