Thomas Wilson (Pennsylvania)

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Thomas Wilson (1772 – October 4, 1824) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Thomas Wilson was born near Sunbury, Pennsylvania. He had the contract for supplying the western forts of the United States from Niagara to New Orleans. He was engaged in shipbuilding in Erie, Pennsylvania, in 1805 and built vessels for commerce on the Great Lakes. He was burgess of Erie in 1807, town clerk in 1808, treasurer of Erie County from 1809 to 1812, and county commissioner in 1811. He was also a justice of the peace.

Sunbury, Pennsylvania Place in Pennsylvania, United States

Sunbury is a city in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, just downstream of the confluence of its main and west branches. It dates to the early 18th century and is the county seat of Northumberland County.

Fort Niagara fort

Fort Niagara is a fortification originally built to protect the interests of New France in North America. It is located near Youngstown, New York, on the eastern bank of the Niagara River at its mouth, on Lake Ontario.

Erie, Pennsylvania City in Pennsylvania

Erie is a city on the south shore of Lake Erie and the county seat of Erie County, Pennsylvania, United States. Named for the lake and the Native American Erie people who lived in the area until the mid-17th century, Erie is the fourth-largest city in Pennsylvania, as well as the largest city in Northwestern Pennsylvania, with a population of 101,786 at the 2010 census. The estimated population in 2017 had decreased to 97,369. The Erie metropolitan area, equivalent to all of Erie County, consists of 276,207 residents. The Erie-Meadville, PA Combined Statistical Area has a population of 369,331, as of the 2010 Census.

Wilson was elected as a Republican to the Thirteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused when the representative-elect Abner Lacock resigned before taking his seat. He was reelected to the Fourteenth Congress. He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives from 1817 to 1820. He was prothonotary and clerk of court of Erie County from 1819 to 1824. He died in Erie in 1824.

13th United States Congress

The Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1813, to March 4, 1815, during the fifth and sixth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority. The first two sessions were held at the Capitol building while the third, convened after the Burning of Washington, took place in the First Patent Building.

Abner Lacock American politician

Abner Lacock was an American surveyor, civil engineer, and politician from Rochester, Pennsylvania. He served in both houses in the state legislature and represented Pennsylvania in both the U.S. House and Senate.

14th United States Congress 1815-1817 legislative term

The Fourteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in the Old Brick Capitol in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1815, to March 4, 1817, during the seventh and eighth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

Sources

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District Created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district

1813–1817
Succeeded by
Robert Moore



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