Thomas Windsor, 1st Viscount Windsor

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Thomas Windsor, 1st Viscount Windsor
DiedJune 1738
Occupation Politician   Oojs ui icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

Lieutenant-General Thomas Windsor, 1st Viscount Windsor (c.1670 8 June 1738), styled The Honourable Thomas Windsor until 1699, was a British Army officer, landowner and Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1685 and 1712.

British Army land warfare branch of the British Armed Forces of the United Kingdom

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2018, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

House of Commons of Great Britain historic British lower house of Parliament

The House of Commons of Great Britain was the lower house of the Parliament of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801. In 1707, as a result of the Acts of Union of that year, it replaced the House of Commons of England and the third estate of the Parliament of Scotland, as one of the most significant changes brought about by the Union of the kingdoms of England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Life

Windsor was the second son of Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, by his second wife Ursula Widdrington, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Thomas Widdrington and Frances Fairfax. [1]

Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, PC was the son of Dixie Hickman and his wife Elizabeth Windsor, sister and heiress of Thomas, 6th Baron Windsor. He assumed the additional surname of Windsor and succeeded to the Windsor family's estate around Hewell Grange near Redditch in 1645. The same year he distinguished himself in the Battle of Naseby. Hickman-Windsor impressed King Charles I by relieving his garrison at High Ercall.

Thomas Widdrington Chief Baron of the Exchequer

Sir Thomas Widdrington SL was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1664. He was speaker of the House of Commons in 1656.

He was made a Page of Honour to James II in 1685 (a post he held until the king was deposed in 1688) and a few months later was returned to Parliament for Droitwich, despite being only around sixteen at the time. Lord Willoughby de Eresby wanted both him and Peter Legh expelled as minors. Windsor took no part in the proceedings of Parliament and was not re-elected in 1687. [1]

Page of Honour ceremonial position in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom

A Page of Honour is a ceremonial position in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. It requires attendance on state occasions, but does not now involve the daily duties which were once attached to the office of page. The only physical activity involved is usually carrying the long train of the Queen's dress.

James II of England King of England, Scotland and Ireland

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The last Roman Catholic monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, his reign is now remembered primarily for struggles over religious tolerance. However, it also involved the principles of absolutism and divine right of kings and his deposition ended a century of political and civil strife by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown.

Droitwich was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of England in 1295, and again from 1554, then of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was a parliamentary borough in Worcestershire, represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832, and by one member from 1832 to 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP from 1885 until 1918.

During the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685 Windsor had served as a cornet in Lord Plymouth's Horse under his father. He continued to serve in the Army as a captain in Sir John Fenwick's Regiment in 1687, as a lieutenant-colonel in Viscount Colchester's Regiment between 1690 and 1694, as a colonel of horse between 1694 and 1697, 1702 and 1707 and 1711 and 1712 and of the 3rd Dragoon Guards between 1712 and 1717. He was promoted to brigadier in 1702, to major-general in 1704 and to lieutenant-general in 1710. [1]

Monmouth Rebellion

The Monmouth Rebellion, also known as the Pitchfork Rebellion, the Revolt of the West or the West Country rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow James II. Prince James, Duke of York, had become King of England, Scotland, and Ireland upon the death of his elder brother Charles II on 6 February 1685. James II was a Roman Catholic and some Protestants under his rule opposed his kingship. James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II, claimed to be rightful heir to the throne and attempted to displace James II.

Sir John Fenwick, 3rd Baronet was an English Jacobite conspirator, who succeeded to the Baronetcy of Fenwick on the death of his father in 1676.

Richard Savage, 4th Earl Rivers English soldier and rake

Richard Savage, 4th Earl Rivers PC was the second son of Thomas, 3rd Earl and his first wife Elizabeth Scrope. After the death about 1680 of his elder brother Thomas, styled Viscount Colchester, he was designated by that title until he succeeded to the peerage.

In 1692 he was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber in King William's private household, serving until the King's death in 1702. In 1699 he was elevated to the Peerage of Ireland as Viscount Windsor, of Blackcastle. [2] This being an Irish peerage he was still eligible for election to the English House of Commons, and in 1705 he was once again returned to Parliament for Bramber, a seat he held until 1708. Between 1708 and 1712 he represented Monmouthshire. The latter year he was created an English peer as Baron Mountjoy, in the Isle of Wight, as one of twelve peers created to secure a Tory majority in the House of Lords. [2]

The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as lord or king of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are duke, marquess, earl, viscount and baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies. The Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland continues to exercise jurisdiction over the Peerage of Ireland, including those peers whose titles derive from places located in what is now the Republic of Ireland. Article 40.2 of the Irish Constitution forbids the state conferring titles of nobility and a citizen may not accept titles of nobility or honour except with the prior approval of the Government. As stated above, this issue does not arise in respect of the Peerage of Ireland, as no creations of titles in it have been made since the Constitution came into force.

Bramber was a parliamentary borough in Sussex, one of the most notorious of all the rotten boroughs. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1295, and again from 1472 until 1832, when the constituency was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

Lord Windsor married Lady Charlotte Herbert, only daughter of Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke, and Henriette de Kéroualle (sister of Louise de Kéroualle, the principal mistress to King Charles II of England), and widow of John Jeffreys, 2nd Baron Jeffreys, in 1703. They had one son and at least four daughters. She died in November 1733. Lord Windsor died in June 1738 and was succeeded in his titles by his son, Herbert.<ref name=HOP2/

Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke English nobleman and convicted murderer

Philip Herbert, 7th Earl of Pembroke, 4th Earl of Montgomery KB was an English nobleman and politician who succeeded to the titles and estates of two earldoms on 8 July 1674 on the death of his brother William Herbert, 6th Earl of Pembroke.

Charles II of England King of England, Scotland and Ireland

Charles II was king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the 1660 Restoration of the monarchy until his death.

Baron Jeffreys

Baron Jeffreys is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in the Peerage of England on 16 May 1685 when the lawyer and later Lord Chancellor, Sir George Jeffreys, 1st Baronet, was made Baron Jeffreys, of Wem. He had already been created a Baronet, of Bulstrode in the County of Buckingham, in the Baronetage of England in 1681. The titles became extinct on the death of his son, the second Baron, in 1702.

He inherited the Lower Avon Navigation from his father, who had acquired the rights to it from the future King James II of England.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "WINDSOR, Hon. Thomas (c.1669-1738), of Tardebigge, Worcs". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  2. 1 2 "WINDSOR, Thomas, 1st Visct. Windsor [I] (c.1669-1738), of Tardebigge, Worcs". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 2 July 2019.
Attribution
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Hon. Henry Coventry
Samuel Sandys I
Member of Parliament for Droitwich
1685–1687
With: Samuel Sandys II
Succeeded by
Samuel Sandys II
The Lord Coote
Preceded by
John Asgill
Samuel Sambrooke
Member of Parliament for Bramber
1705–1707
With: John Asgill
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Bramber
1707–1708
With: William Shippen
Succeeded by
William Hale
Sir Cleave More, Bt
Preceded by
John Morgan
Sir Hopton Williams, Bt
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1708–1712
With: John Morgan
Succeeded by
John Morgan
James Gunter
Military offices
Preceded by
Cornelius Wood
Colonel of Viscount Windsor's Regiment of Horse
1712–1616
Succeeded by
George Wade
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Viscount Windsor
1699–1738
Succeeded by
Herbert Windsor
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Mountjoy
1712–1738
Succeeded by
Herbert Windsor