Thomas Winnington (1696–1746)

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Thomas Winnington as a child, painted by Michael Dahl C13b.jpeg
Thomas Winnington as a child, painted by Michael Dahl

Thomas Winnington PC (31 December 1696 23 April 1746), of Stanford Court, Stanford on Teme. Worcestershire, was an English Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1726 to 1746.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Contents

Biography

Winnington was the second, but eldest surviving, son of Salwey Winnington of Stanford Court, Member of Parliament for Bewdley, and his wife Anne Foley, daughter of Thomas Foley, MP, of Witley Court, Worcestershire. He was grandson of Sir Francis Winnington, who had been Solicitor General in the 1670s. He was educated at Westminster School and matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford in 1713. He was admitted to Middle Temple in 1714.

Salwey Winnington, of Stanford Court, Worcestershire, was an English landowner and Member of Parliament (MP).

Bewdley was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1605 until 1950. Until 1885 it was a parliamentary borough in Worcestershire, represented by one Member of Parliament; the name was then transferred to a county constituency from 1885 until 1950. Its MPs included the former Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, who represented the seat from 1908 to 1937, and afterwards took the name of the constituency as part of his title when he was raised to the peerage.

Francis Winnington (Solicitor-General) Solicitor-General for England and Wales

Sir Francis Winnington was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1677 and 1698. He became Solicitor-General to King Charles II.

Winnington entered Parliament at a by-election on 31 January 1726 as a Tory Member of Parliament for Droitwich, but very soon after became a Whig and supported the Administration. He was returned unopposed again in 1727 and 1734. At the 1741 returned for Droitwich and also elected in a contest for Worcester (a more prestigious constituency), and he chose to sit for Worcester in what turned out to be his last Parliament. [1]

Droitwich was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of England in 1295, and again from 1554, then of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was a parliamentary borough in Worcestershire, represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832, and by one member from 1832 to 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP from 1885 until 1918.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

1734 British general election

The 1734 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 8th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Robert Walpole's increasingly unpopular Whig government lost ground to the Tories and the opposition Whigs, but still had a secure majority in the House of Commons. The Patriot Whigs were joined in opposition by a group of Whig members led by Lord Cobham known as the Cobhamites, or 'Cobham's Cubs'

A supporter of the Prime Minister Robert Walpole, Winnington was made a Lord of the Admiralty in 1730, and served as a Lord of the Treasury from 1736 to 1742; in 1741 he was made a Privy Counsellor and became Cofferer of the Household. When Henry Pelham became Prime Minister in 1743, he appointed Winnington Paymaster General of the Forces, the post he himself had held in the previous administration (although unlike Pelham, Winnington was not accorded a seat in the Cabinet); he held this post for the remaining two-and-a-half years of his life. [1]

Robert Walpole British statesman and art collector, 1st Earl of Orford

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford,, known between 1725 and 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British politician who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Cofferer of the Household

The Cofferer of the Household was formerly an office in the English and British Royal Household. Next in rank to the Comptroller, the holder paid the wages of some of the servants above and below stairs, was a member of the Board of Green Cloth, and sat with the Lord Steward in the Court of the Verge. The cofferer was usually of political rank and always a member of the Privy Council.

Henry Pelham Prime Minister of Great Britain

Henry Pelham was a British Whig statesman, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 27 August 1743 until his death. He was the younger brother of Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle, who served in Pelham's government and succeeded him as Prime Minister. Pelham is generally considered to have been Britain's third Prime Minister after Sir Robert Walpole and the Earl of Wilmington.

Winnington purchased the shares of the elder sisters in the family estate of Stanford (which his grandfather Sir Francis had acquired for the family through his second marriage), and in 1674 he bought the leasehold interest under the crown of the manor of Bewdley.

Family

In 1719, Winnington married Love Reade, daughter of Sir James Reade, Bt. of Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire. They had no children. The Stanford Court estate subsequently passed to his cousin who became Sir Edward Winnington, 1st Baronet. The Elizabethan mansion of Stanford Court was burnt on 5 December 1882, and the valuable books and manuscripts in the old library were destroyed. [2] Stanford Court was rebuilt and remained the family seat until sold by Sir Francis Winnington, 6th Baronet in 1949. [3]

Brocket Hall country house in Hertfordshire, England

Brocket Hall is a Grade I-listed classical country house set in a large park at the western side of the urban area of Welwyn Garden City in Hertfordshire, England. The estate is equipped with two golf courses and seven smaller listed buildings, apart from the main house.

Hertfordshire County of England

Hertfordshire is one of the home counties in southern England. It is bordered by Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England region.

Sir Edward Winnington, 1st Baronet was the son of Edward Winnington of Broadway, son of Francis Winnington of Broadway, son of Sir Francis Winnington and younger brother of Francis Winnington.

Notes

  1. 1 2 "WINNINGTON, Thomas (1696-1746), of Stanford Court, Worcs". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  2. Courtney 1900 , p. 197 cites Hist. MSS. Comm. 1st Rep. app. pp. 53–5.
  3. Haddon 2013.

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References

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<i>Dictionary of National Biography</i> Multi-volume reference work

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Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Richard Foley
Edward Winnington (later Jeffreys)
Member of Parliament for Droitwich
1726–1742
With: Richard Foley 1726–1732
Edward Foley 1732–1741
Thomas Foley 1741–1742
Succeeded by
Thomas Foley
Lord George Bentinck
Preceded by
Samuel Sandys
Richard Lockwood
Member of Parliament for Worcester
1741–1746
With: Samuel Sandys 1741–1744
Sir Henry Harpur 1744–1746
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Harpur
Thomas Vernon
Political offices
Preceded by
Horace Walpole
Cofferer of the Household
1741–1743
Succeeded by
The Lord Sandys
Preceded by
Henry Pelham
Paymaster General of the Forces
1743–1746
Succeeded by
William Pitt