Thomas Winstanley

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Thomas Winstanley (1749 – 2 September 1823) was an academic at the University of Oxford, who held the positions of Camden Professor of Ancient History, Laudian Professor of Arabic, and principal of St Alban Hall.

University of Oxford University in Oxford, United Kingdom

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as early as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation after the University of Bologna. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly called 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

The Camden Professorship of Ancient History at the University of Oxford was established in 1622 by English antiquary and historian William Camden, Clarenceux King of Arms, and endowed with the income of the manor of Bexley, becoming the first and oldest chair of history in England. Since 1877 it has been attached to Brasenose College, and since 1910 it has been limited to Roman history.

Laudian Professor of Arabic

The position of Laudian Professor of Arabic at the University of Oxford was established in 1636 by William Laud, who at the time was Chancellor of the University of Oxford and Archbishop of Canterbury. The first professor was Edward Pococke, who was working as a chaplain in Aleppo in what is now Syria when Laud asked him to return to Oxford to take up the position. Laud's regulations for the professorship required lectures on Arabic grammar and literature to be delivered weekly during university vacations and Lent. He also provided that the professor's lectures were to be attended by all medical students and Bachelors of Arts at the university, although this seems not to have happened since Pococke had few students, despite the provision for non-attenders to be fined. In 1881, a university statute repealed Laud's regulations and provided that the professor was to lecture in "the Arabic, Syriac, and Chaldee Languages", and attached the professorship to a fellowship at St John's College.

Life

Winstanley was born in the town of Winstanley, in what was then Lancashire, and was baptised on 11 November 1749. After an education at Manchester Grammar School, he matriculated at the University of Oxford as a member of Brasenose College in 1768, obtaining his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1771 and his Master of Arts degree in 1774. He was appointed to a fellowship at Hertford College and succeeded Thomas Warton as Camden Professor of Ancient History in 1790. He was elected principal of St Alban Hall in 1797, and appointed as Laudian Professor of Arabic in 1814 (holding this in addition to the Camden chair). He was rector of Steyning, Sussex, between 1790 and 1792; prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral from 1794 to 1810; and vicar of St Nicholas and St Clements, Rochester, Kent, from 1812. His writings included Aristotelous peri poiētikēs: Aristotelis de poetica liber (1780), and an edition of the works of Daniel Webb (1802). Winstanley died on 2 September 1823. [1]

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References

  1. Carlyle, E. I.; Carter, Philip (January 2008). "Winstanley, Thomas (1749–1823)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 6 January 2010.